Babesia divergens


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Ba·be·si·a di·ver·'gens

the cause of bovine babesiosis in western and central Europe; vector tick is Ixodes ricinus; it has caused human babesiosis in splenectomized patients in Europe; also found in reindeer.
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

Babesia divergens

A species that is the primary cause of babesiosis in Europe. Like other forms of babesiosis, it is transmitted to humans by tick bite. Although it primarily infects immunocompromised humans, it can also cause red-water fever in cattle resulting in significant losses of livestock.
See also: Babesia
Medical Dictionary, © 2009 Farlex and Partners
References in periodicals archive ?
Infection of the Mongolian gerbil with the cattle piroplasm Babesia divergens. Nature.
Epidemiological survey of Babesia species in Japan performed with specimens from ticks collected from dogs and detection of new Babesia DNA closely related to Babesia odocoilei and Babesia divergens DNA.
Detection of Babesia divergens using molecular methods in anemic patients in Shandong Province, China.
Redescription of Babesia capreoli (Enigk and Friedhoff, 1962) from roe deer (Capreolus capreolus): isolation, cultivation, host specificity, molecular characterisation and differentiation from Babesia divergens. Int J Parasitol.
Large scale survey of bovine babesiosis due to Babesia divergens in France.
Among these pathogens, 2 zoonotic Babesia species have been described in Europe: the well-known cattle parasite Babesia divergens (1) and the more recently reported roe deer parasite Babesia sp.
Transstadial and transovarial persistence of Babesia divergens DNA in Ixodes ricinus ticks fed on infected blood in a new skin-feeding technique.
canis canis, Babesia canis vogeli, Babesia canis rossi, Babesia odocoilei, Babesia divergens, Babesia caballi, Babesia gibsoni, B.
A bovine parasite, Babesia divergens has been implicated as the most common agent of this dangerous zoonosis in Europe (1).
We thank Al Chan for providing pretreatment blood smears; Karen Eady for facilitating collection of data about and blood specimens from the patient; Gale Wagner and Patricia Holman for providing the Purnell strain of Babesia divergens; the U.S.
In Europe, most reported human cases of babesiosis have been attributed, without strong molecular evidence, to infection with the bovine parasite Babesia divergens. We investigated the first known human cases of babesiosis in Italy and Austria, which occurred in two asplenic men.