BK virus


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Related to BK virus: Polyomavirus

BK vi·rus

a human polyomavirus, in the family Papovaviridae, of worldwide distribution, that produces kidney infections that are usually subclinical in immunocompetent people.
[initials of patient from whom first isolated]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

BK virus

A small human polyomavirus which, like the JC virus, can transform infected cells in culture; up to 80% of the general population (US) have been exposed to it.

Clinical findings
Primary BKV infection is usually subclinical, most common in early childhood, persists in renal epithelium and may become reactivated, causing severe tubulointerstitial nephritis, and cystitis in BM transplant recipients or in immunocompromised patients—e.g., those with hyper-IgM immunodeficiency syndrome; BKV may cause encephalitis.
 
Diagnosis
Serology—IgM, IgG antibodies; PCR; T2-weighted MRI.
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

BK virus

Infectious disease A small human polyomavirus which, like the JC virus, can transform infected cells in culture; 1º BKV infection is usually subclinical, is most common in early childhood, persists in renal epithelium and may be reactivated, causing severe tubulointerstitial nephritis, and cystitis in BM transplant recipients, or in the immunocompromised Pts–eg, those with hyper-IgM immunodeficiency syndrome; BKV may cause encephalitis Diagnosis Serology–IgM, IgG antibodies; PCR, T2-weighted MRI. See Polyomavirus. Cf JC virus.
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
BK virus infection is associated with hematuria and renal impairment in recipients of allogeneic hematopoetic stem cell transplants.
Isada, "Delirium in a renal transplant recipient associated with BK virus in the cerebrospinal fluid," Transplantation, vol.
BK virus is a member of the polyoma family and is generally seropositive in the majority of the population.
In this focus issue, you will find articles on immunosuppression, the history of transplant nursing, BK virus, the new organ allocation system, the role of the independent living donor advocate, a living donor chain, steroid withdrawal, and more.
EBV, HCMV, and Polyoma BK virus have been identified in resected adrenocortical tumors; the former has also been associated with lymphoma of the adrenal gland [38, 39].
Approximately 30%, 11-13%, and 8% of kidney transplant recipients develop BK viruria, viremia, and BK virus associated nephropathy (BKVAN), respectively [1-3].
This CSF sample was negative for bacteria by Gram and acid-fast stains, for cryptococcal antigen by latex agglutination, and for cytomegalovirus, BK virus, herpes simplex virus, JC virus, human herpes virus 6, and varicella-zoster virus by polymerase chain reaction (PCR); however, the sample was not tested for WNV.
BK virus (BKV) was first isolated from a Sudanese renal transplant recipient (initials BK) with ureteral stenosis [11].