BIS monitor

BIS monitor

A device used to give warning that a patient under general anaesthesia might be in a state of awareness or feeling pain. The device is a single electrode ELECTROENCEPHALOGRAM that performs bispectral analysis of the complex waveforms from the brain to produce an index of awareness on a scale in which 100 is full wakefulness.
References in periodicals archive ?
Routine monitors were attached, including electrocardiogram, non-invasive blood pressure, pulse oxymeter and BIS monitor (BIS, Aspect Medical Systems, Newton, MA, USA), and baseline parameters such as heart rate (HR), systolic blood pressure, diastolic blood pressure, mean blood pressure and arterial oxygen saturation, were recorded.
The BIS monitor was the first quantitative EEG device introduced into clinical practice to assess the depth of anesthesia.
At the same time BIS reading was taken using Aspect BIS monitor.
Conventional EEG recording showed a pattern of burst suppression and raw EEG from BIS monitor showed an isoelectric signal.
Bispectral index (BIS) has recently been developed to monitor depth of anesthesia, and the level of BIS was correlated with the level of hypnosis.[sup][4] Previous investigations have showed that BIS monitor in ICU may help improve sedation and even during invasive events.[sup][5],[6],[7]
Performance of linear model predicative controller (LMPC) is comparable to PID considering the time delay introduced by BIS monitor during anesthesia control.
BIS monitor is a helpful device for adequate depth of anesthesia during operation.
Additionally the probe of BIS monitor (Aspect Medical Systems) was adhered to the forehead and the values were recorded and the patient was given nasal O2 at a rate of 2 lt/min.
BIS monitor, which is a commercial device, integrates several disparate descriptors of the EEG into a single variable which is called BIS index.
These limitations of the BIS monitor may be associated with the fact that its algorithm was developed based on EEG and clinical endpoints recorded in human patients and, consequently, may not be adapted to cats' EEG characteristics.