BCS theory


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BCS theory

Bardeen Cooper Schreiffer theor. A theory that explains superconductivity, where 2 electrons—a Cooper pair—of opposite spin and momentum are bound together so that they have zero net spin and momentum. The attractive force behind this pairing is a subtle interaction between the negative charge of electrons and the positive charge of ion cores in the superconducting material. These ion cores are simply atoms that have lost one or more of their outermost electrons, which become free to conduct electricity. The ion cores are pulled in toward an electron as it moves through the lattice of a solid, creating a region of enhanced positive charge. The theory is named after J Bardeen, LN Cooper and JR Schreiffer.
References in periodicals archive ?
As it follows from numerical calculations shown in Figure 5 and in Table 1, as distinct from the BCS theory, the value of the jump depends on the phonon frequency.
Robert Schrieffer of Bell Labs proposed their now well-known BCS theory (the name derived from a combination of their initials) - a theory that accounted for most of the properties of superconductors.
"One group believes that BCS theory can be extended to understand these systems without any major revision of the way we think about metals," Coleman comments.
The BCS theory says that in superconductors, electrons travel in pairs, allowing electricity to flow freely throughout the material (SN: 3/14/87, p.164).