received pronunciation

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received pronunciation

The standard accent of British English, which is typically spoken in the south of England. While RP is not intrinsically better than other regional accents, it is typically the accent native to, or adopted by, Britons with power, money, education and influence, a tendency that began in the early 20th century. It is the accent spoken or adopted by most doctors in the UK.
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References in periodicals archive ?
In her Conclusion, Mugglestone describes how "BBC English" came into being and continued to spread the ideology of standard speech into the twentieth century.
"BBC English will be confronted if it abuses its legal rights by producing for BBC Persian--and we are continually on watch for that," Saffar-Harandi said.
He has become a great defender of all language and is worried not a jot by what others see as the dereliction of the language or the demise of so-called BBC English.
Veteran broadcaster Julian Pettifer, using his best BBC English, asked the much-decorated officer: "Colonel, what would be the effect of one of these exploding over central London?".
The figures, obtained by the BBC English Regions data journalism team, showed that 343 libraries have shut since 2010 and another 111 closures are planned this year.
David Holdsworth, the controller who commissioned the mosaic on behalf of BBC English Regions, said: "We always aim to put audiences at the very heart of what the BBC does and on this occasion we have been able to achieve that literally.
"I'm delighted to be joining this region which is so pivotal to both BBC English Regions and the BBC as a whole.
It is understood that Mailbox staff were addressed in Birmingham earlier this week by BBC English Regions controller David Holdsworth, who had been told of concerns over bullying as long ago as March.
David Holdsworth, Controller of BBC English Regions, added: "All of our Power of Sport award winners are making a real difference through sport to the lives of people in their communities.
Winners be chosen in each BBC English region and in Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland.
The trouble with Buailtes And Fadas is you have to back him on the Tote because the local Irish speakers will crease themsleves with laughter if you go down to the ring and say in your best BBC English: "Good afternoon my good man, I'd like a hundred of your jolly old euros on Booayltees And Fade-Arse." Much easier to go to the Nanny and say: "I'd like the last bits of me boots on number six." In fact the wretched beast is pronounced Booltchas And Foddass, but if you speak Irish as well as I do you just stand there watching the race and yell "come on the Bolger yoke" at the top of your voice.
Would we think of them in the same way if they chatted away in that silly, plummy accent once known as BBC English, and which made broadcasters sound as if they were desperate to dash off to the loo?