usog

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usog

A culture-bound (“folk”) syndrome described in Filipinos, which is loosely equivalent to the Spanish mal de ojo superstition. Usog primarily affects infants and young children who have been greeted by a stranger; once affected, the child may develop fever and convulsions. Various cures are said to be effective, including boiling the child’s clothing or rubbing the stranger’s saliva on the child’s abdomen, shoulder or forehead. The only scientific explanation for this phenomenon may be that the child becomes extremely stressed by the stranger, resulting in extreme physical symptoms.
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
Looking in detail at the making of anthropological knowledge on Bali and Lombok shows how the Balinese and Sasak were racialised through the work of anthropologists.
In the case of Bali and Lombok, some anthropological categories were appropriated by local communities.
Reuter suggests that 'the Bali Aga villages presently known to scholars and tourists alike are those few that attracted the attention of colonial explorers in their initial search for pristine Balinese villages'.
(2) Ira Jacknis, 'Margaret Mead and Gregory Bateson in Bali: Their use of photography and film', Cultural Anthropology 3, 2 (1988): 160-77.
1907; Adrian Vickers, Bali: A paradise created (Berkeley, CA: Periplus, 1989), p.
Reuter, Custodians of the sacred mountains: Culture and society in the highlands of Bali (Honolulu: University of Hawai'i Press, 2002), p.
(16) Vickers, Bali; Henk Schulte Nordholt, 'The making of traditional Bali: Colonial ethnography and bureaucratic reproduction', History and Anthropology 8, 1-4 (1994): 89-127.
(17) Adrian Vickers, 'Hinduism and Islam in Indonesia: Bali and the Pasisir world', Indonesia 44 (1987): 31-58; Kari Telle, 'Changing spiritual landscapes and religious politics on Lombok', in Between harmony and discrimination: Negotiating religious identities within majority-minority relationships in Bali and Lombok, ed.
Kleiweg de Zwaan, Anthropologische Untersuchungen auf Bali und Lombok (Leiden: Brill, 1942), p.