BAL


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BAL

 
British antilewisite; see dimercaprol.

BAL

BAL

dimercaprol (British antilewisite).

BAL

abbr.
British anti-lewisite

BAL

1 abbreviation for British antilewisite. See dimercaprol.
2 abbreviation for bronchoalveolar lavage.

BAL

1. Blood alcohol level, see there.
2. Bronchoalveolar lavage, see there.

BAL

Abbreviation for British anti-Lewisite; bronchoalveolar lavage.

BAL

Abbrev. for British antilewisite, or DIMERCAPROL.

Dimercaprol (BAL)

A chemical agent used to remove excess lead from the body.
Mentioned in: Lead Poisoning

BAL

British antilewisite. See dimercaprol.
References in periodicals archive ?
In our study in comparison to BAL, CT FNAC has a higher number of true positive and true negative cases with sensitivity of 100%, showing its superiority over BAL in diagnosing lung cancer.
Cytological sampling by BAL relies mainly on cells exfoliated from malignant lesion in bronchial epithelium.
Squamous cell carcinoma which is more frequently located in proximal bronchus showed positivity in 13 cases through BAL cytology.
Correspondingly, the time-dependent effects of ufCB on the production of TNF-[alpha] and VEGF in BAL fluid were determined.
Taken together, there was a significant elevation of TNF-[alpha], VEGF, and total proteins in BAL fluid at 4 hr postinstillation to ufCB.
Our data in Figure 2A reveal a peak increase of TNF-[alpha] in BAL fluid 4 hr after instillation of ufCB.
Levels of LDH, total protein, and EPO in BAL fluid were measured to evaluate pulmonary cell membrane integrity, edema, and eosinophil activition, respectively.
Pulmonary allergic inflammation in response to HDM was examined by differential cell count of BAL fluid.
The secretion of the pro-inflammatory cytokine TNF-[Alpha] in serum and BAL fluid differed between two dietary groups.
Using fictional journalistic accounts of the bals de l'Opera, anecdotes culled from memoirs, and even an unpublished play, Semmens underlines with startling clarity the radical difference in their culture from that of the bals pares under Louis XIV.
The dance repertoire largely consisted of contredanses and minuets, the latter growing less popular after 1745, judging by both musical and choreographic sources with connections to the bals de l'Opera, which Semmens carefully catalogues.
In discussing what the lost violin part books used at the bals de l'Opera might have looked like, for example, Semmens proposes as a model a part book that has survived at the Bibliotheque de l'Opera (p.