vitamin B12 deficiency

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vitamin B12 deficiency

Megalobalstic anemia, see there.
References in periodicals archive ?
His vision had worsened to the point of permanent blindness by 17 years of age, and doctors identified vitamin B12 deficiency, low copper and selenium levels, a high zinc level, reduced vitamin D level and bone level density, according to a statement from the University.
Falling short can lead to tiredness, muscle weakness and memory loss, so anyone going vegan may want to take the Viapath Nutris postal blood test for B12 deficiency (PS40, nutris.viapath.co.uk) after the first few months.
The signs of a vitamin B12 deficiency can come out in a multitude of ways.
Vitamin B12 deficiency is most frequently result from defective absorption of vitamin, while folate deficiency is most commonly due to inadequate dietary intake.
The camp was held at the Karachi Institutes of the THF, with the core purpose educating students and to spread awareness about the prevention, eradication and screening of hepatitis B and C within the community and in addition to be also screened out for dietary and hereditary anemia, such as iron deficiency, B12 deficiency anemia and thalassemia minor.
The blood screening camp was held at the Karachi Institutes of the THF, with the core purpose educating students and to spread awareness about the Prevention, eradication and screening of HEP B and C within the community and in addition to be also screened out for dietary and hereditary anemia, such as Iron Deficiency, B12 Deficiency Anemia and Thalassemia minor.
In addition to causing cognitive problems, vitamin B12 deficiency may cause anemia, as well as fatigue, muscle weakness and other neurological symptoms.
The severe B12 deficiency can lead to serious nerve damage in some cases, which causes tingling and numbness in the fingers and toes and other extremities, and even difficulties with walking and pains in affected areas.
Objective: To study the correlation between vitamin B12 deficiency and hyperbilirubinemia and cholestasis in infants.
On stratification by type of disorders leading to methylmalonic acidurias, 9(22%) had methylmalonic acidemia, 12(29%) had Cobalamin-related remethylation disorders, nonspecific methylmalonic acidurias in 16(39%), while 2(5%) each had succinyl coenzyme A synthetase and Vitamin B12 deficiency. respectively.