Bacillus thuringiensis

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Ba·cil·lus thu·rin·gi·en·sis

a bacterial species that is an insect pathogen used for vector control that has been implicated in human and mammalian infections. In the laboratory it may be misdiagnosed as a strain of Bacillus cereus.
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

Bacillus thuringiensis

(Bt) an entomopathogenic BACILLUS species that produces a TOXIN called delta (8) endotoxin, which kills insect larvae. The organism is used as a microbial INSECTICIDE for the BIOLOGICAL CONTROL of various LEPIDOPTERA. Genes for the toxin have been transferred to plants by GENETIC ENGINEERING techniques to make them insect-tolerant. See also BIOPESTICIDE.
Collins Dictionary of Biology, 3rd ed. © W. G. Hale, V. A. Saunders, J. P. Margham 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
B. thuringiensis strains have showed a wide range of specificity for insects like Lepidopteran, Coleoptera, Hymenoptera, Homoptera, Mallophaga and Diptera.
When those insects received the B. thuringiensis toxin, few of them died.
During batch growth, B. thuringiensis cells change from vegetative to sporulated cells.
cereus and B. thuringiensis are genetically closely related to B.
cereus and 2 B. thuringiensis were positive by the CW-DFA assay, and 1 B.
A total of three novel subclass cry4 genes were found from five mosquitocidal B. thuringiensis strains.
Most contemporary bioinsecticides are derived from scaled-up cultures of Bacillus thuringiensis subspecies israelensis (Bti) and kurstaki (Btk), whose particulate fractions contain mostly B. thuringiensis spores ([is greater than] [10.sup.12]/L) and proteinaceous aggregates, including crystal-like parasporal inclusion bodies (PIB).
Toxins from B. thuringiensis kill susceptible insects by binding to and disrupting the integrity of the midgut epithelium (Gill et al.
The use of microbial insecticides, especially bacterial formulations made from B. thuringiensis are in widespread use to manage the outbreak of several notorious insect pests because of their safe nature to humans including other mammals and non-target species.
B. thuringiensis (Bt), a ubiquitous gram-positive spore-forming bacterium, forms parasporal proteins during the stationary phase of its growth (Osman et al., 2015).
bassiana (1.5A-106, 1.5A-107 and 1.5A-108 conidia mL-1) and one of B. thuringiensis (0.5 g g-1) were applied alone and in combination against 2nd and 4th larval instars.