bacteriostatic

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bacteriostatic

 [bak-te″re-o-stat´ik]
arresting the growth or multiplication of bacteria; also, an agent that so acts.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

bac·te·ri·o·stat·ic

(bak-tēr'ē-ō-stat'ik),
Inhibiting or retarding the multiplication of bacteria.
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

bacteriostatic

adjective Referring to inhibition of bacterial growth and/or reproduction.
 
noun An agent which inhibits bacterial growth and/or reproduction.
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

bacteriostatic

Biology adjective Referring to inhibition of bacterial growth and/or reproduction noun An agent that inhibits bacterial growth and/or reproduction. Cf Bactericidal.
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

bac·te·ri·o·stat·ic

(bak-tēr'ē-ō-stat'ik)
Inhibiting or retarding the growth of bacteria.
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

bacteriostatic

Able to restrain or control the multiplication of bacteria, without actually killing them. When a bacteriostatic effect is achieved organisms are more susceptible to destruction by the immune system.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005

bacteristatic

or

bacteriostatic

capable of inhibiting the growth of BACTERIA, but not of killing them. Compare BACTERICIDAL.
Collins Dictionary of Biology, 3rd ed. © W. G. Hale, V. A. Saunders, J. P. Margham 2005

bacteriostatic 

A term describing substances such as sulfonamides and tetracycline which inhibit the growth and propagation of bacteria, but do not actually destroy bacteria. See antibiotic.
Millodot: Dictionary of Optometry and Visual Science, 7th edition. © 2009 Butterworth-Heinemann

bac·te·ri·o·stat·ic

(bak-tēr'ē-ō-stat'ik)
Inhibiting or retarding the multiplication of bacteria.
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
The researchers then isolated rifampin-resistant B. gingivalis itself from 10 of the 16 sites.
Says Robert Genco, director of one of five NIDR centers for periodontal disease at the State University of New York at Buffalo: "It appears B. gingivalis is getting support as a periodontal pathogen."