B chromosome

(redirected from B-chromosome)

B chromosome

Genetics A supernumerary–'extra' segment of DNA present in many species, which may be driven to self-duplicate, as BCs are transmitted at higher rates than otherwise expected from classic mendelian genetics
References in periodicals archive ?
2015) supported an A-chromosome origin of the B-chromosome.
Presence or absence of B-chromosome -0,23 0,00 0,68 0,38 0,48 3.
Bewildering Bs: an impression of the 1st B-chromosome conference.
2010) report a study of B chromosomes in a grasshopper species, Eyprepocnemis plorans: this species has become a classic model for the study of B-chromosome evolution and of the parasitic nature of these chromosomes.
2001) determined that a single major gene in an A chromosome controls B-chromosome transmission rate in maize, and that ir acts in the haploid egg cell at the time of fertilization.
As a consequence, the chromosome number of Shiwasuaoba exceeds 2n = 2x = 14 and is not stable for the B-chromosome complement.
The effects of Secale cereale B-chromosomes have been studied both in some B-chromosome carrying cultivated rye varieties and in various hybrids, primarily with Triticum aestivum.
Here, we provide the first empirical evidence of the regeneration of a B-chromosome polymorphism caused by the replacement of a nondriving B by a new B variant showing drive.
The first application of micro-dissection in the plant was to isolate B-chromosome from rye (Sandery et al.
These species allowed a more profound understanding of B-chromosome meiotic behavior, including mechanisms of elimination and accumulation through meiotic drive, B chromosome structure in terms of molecular composition, effects on carriers at the endo- and exophenotypic levels, distribution in natural populations, including cases of clinal variation, and the relationships of Bs with the A genome and their evolution through genomic conflict, especially in E.
Two models have been put forward to explain B-chromosome maintenance in natural populations: the parasitic (Ostergren 1945) and the heterotic (Darlington 1958, White 1973) models.
The frequency of macro-and microspermatids showed an odd-even pattern with respect to the number of B chromosomes, with a higher frequency of abnormal spermatids associated with odd B-chromosome numbers (Teruel et al.