azo dyes


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azo dyes

dyes in which the azo group is the chromophore and joins benzene or naphthalene rings; they include a large number of biologic stains (for example, Congo red and oil red O); also used clinically to promote epithelial growth in the treatment of ulcers, burns, and other wounds; many have anticoagulant action.

a·zo dyes

(āzō dīz)
Dyes in which the azo group is the chromophore and joins benzene or naphthalene rings; they include a large number of biologic stains (e.g., Congo red and oil red O); also used clinically to promote epithelial growth in the treatment of ulcers, burns, and other wounds; many have anticoagulant action.
References in periodicals archive ?
Biodegradation of textile azo dyes by a facultative Staphylococcus arlettae strain VN-11 using a sequential microaerophilic/aerobic process.
Sunset yellow and red bordeaux S (amaranth) are classified as azo dyes, since they are synthesized from various aromatic amines derived from tar (BAFANA et al., 2011; AL-RUBAIE & MHESSN, 2012).
With a better understanding, this synergistic activity of Streptomyces consortia would be further exploited for the degradation of wide range of reactive azo dyes.
The analytical curve method for the Azo dye Reactive Red resulted in the equation y = 1.8918x-0.0041 ([R.sup.2] = 0.9978), where x corresponds to dye concentration and y to absorbance.
Jin, "Effect of food azo dye tartrazine on learning and memory functions in mice and rats, and the possible mechanisms involved," Journal of Food Science, vol.
The chemical structures of reactive azo dyes, Everzol Red 239 and Reactive blue 19 is shown in Fig.
Govindwar, "Bacterial decolorization and degradation of azo dyes: a review," Journal of the Taiwan Institute of Chemical Engineers, vol.
Sun, "Adsorption of azo dyes from aqueous solution by the hybrid MOFs/GO," Water Science and Technology, vol.
Rouhani, "Application of azo dye as sensitizer in dye-sensitized solar cells," Colorants and Coating, vol.
It has been observed that azo dyes can reduce into aromatic amines in the digestive tract of mammals (Chung et al., 1992).
Polymerization study of the aromatic amines generated by the biodegradation of azo dyes using the laccase enzyme.
Degradation of azo dyes by environmental microorganisms and helminths, Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry 54: 435-41.