azeotrope

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Related to Azeotropic Mixture: fractional distillation, Azeotropic distillation

azeotrope

 [a´ze-o-trōp″]
a mixture of two substances that has a constant boiling point and cannot be separated by fractional distillation. adj., adj azeotrop´ic.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

a·ze·o·trope

(ā-zē'ō-trōp),
A mixture of two or more liquids that boils without a change in proportion of the substances either in the liquid or the vapor phase, for example, 95% ethanol (actually 94.9% by volume, the rest being water).
[G. a- priv. + zeō, to boil, + tropos, a turning]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

azeotrope

A mixture of two or more liquids, which boils without change in proportion in either the liquid or vapour phase, meaning they cannot be separated by distillation.
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

a·ze·o·trope

(ā'zē-ō-trōp)
A mixture of two or more liquids that boils without change in proportion of the liquids, either in the liquid or the vapor phase.
A mixture of two or more liquids that boils without change in proportion of the liquids, either in the liquid or the vapor phase.
[G. a- priv. + zeō, to boil, + tropos, a turning]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012
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References in periodicals archive ?
It is thus concluded that the crosslinked PVA/bentonite nanoclay membranes have great potential in pervaporation separation of water-1,4-dioxane azeotropic mixtures.
Effect of nanoclay on (a) preferential sorption and sorption by filler and (b) flux and separation factor for the separation of water and 1,4-dioxane azeotropic mixtures. [Color figure can be viewed at wileyonlinelibrary.com]
The good news at the conference was that several new "ozone-friendly" blowing agents--including fluoroiodocarbons, azeotropic mixtures, and liquid HFCs--are in development.
It has been used to separate close boiling liquids and azeotropic mixtures, which are difficult to separate using conventional separation processes, such as distillation [1-4].
However, distillation is unsuitable for azeotropic mixtures, for separation of organic compounds in low concentration, or for thermally sensitive organic compounds [6].
(2005) have reported the use of mathematical programming for the synthesis of complex distillation columns for the separation of zeotropic and azeotropic mixtures. Their results show that significant energy savings can be obtained.
Both the liquids form azeotropic mixtures at lower compositions of water that are difficult to separate by conventional distillation.