axon

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axon

 [ak´son]
the process of a nerve cell along which impulses travel away from the cell body. It branches at its termination, forming synapses at other nerve cells or effector organs. Many axons are covered by a myelin sheath formed from the cell membrane of a glial cell. adj., adj ax´onal.

ax·on

(ak'son),
1. The single process of a nerve cell that under normal conditions conducts nervous impulses away from the cell body and its remaining processes (dendrites). It is a relatively even filamentous process varying in thickness from about 0.25 to more than 10 mcm. In contrast to dendrites, which rarely exceed 1.5 mm in length, axons can extend great distances from the parent cell body (some axons of the pyramidal tract are 40-50 cm long). Axons that are 0.5 mcm thick or more are generally enveloped by a segmented myelin sheath provided by oligodendroglia cells (in the brain and spinal cord) or Schwann cells (in peripheral nerves). Like dendrites and nerve cell bodies, axons contain many neurofibrils. With some exceptions, nerve cells synaptically transmit impulses to other nerve cells or to effector cells (muscle cells or gland cells) exclusively by way of the synaptic terminals of their axons.
2. In neurology and other clinical work, the term axon is also used as meaning dendrites (q.v.), which term is seldom used clinically.
[G. axōn, axis]

axon

(ăk′sŏn′) also

axone

(-sōn′)
n.
The usually long process of a nerve fiber that generally conducts impulses away from the body of the nerve cell.

ax′on·al (ăk′sə-nəl, ăk-sŏn′əl) adj.

axon

A thin elongated process of a neurone which transmits impulses from the neurone cell body to the axon terminus, which trigger the release of neurotransmitters.

ax·on

(ak'son)
The single process of a nerve cell that under normal conditions conducts nervous impulses away from the cell body and its remaining processes (dendrites). Axons 0.5 mcm thick or thicker are generally enveloped by a segmented myelin sheath provided by oligodendroglia cells (in brain and spinal cord) or Schwann cells (in peripheral nerves). Nerve cells synaptically transmit impulses to other nerve cells or to effector cells (muscle cells, gland cells) exclusively by way of the synaptic terminals of their axons.
[G. axōn, axis]

axon

The long fibre-like process of a nerve cell which, bundled together with many thousands of other axons, forms the anatomical structure known as a nerve. The axon conducts nerve impulses away from the nerve body.

axon

the process of a NERVE cell which conducts impulses from the nerve cell body.

Axon

A process of a neuron that conducts impulses away from the cell body. Axons are usually long and straight.

axon 

The threadlike process of a neuron which conducts nerve impulses from the cell body to the neuron's ending (bouton) where it is transmitted via a synapse to another neuron, muscle or gland. Syn. nerve fibre (when it is sheathed). See neuron; synapse.

ax·on

(ak'son)
1. The single process of a nerve cell that under normal conditions conducts nervous impulses away from the cell body and its remaining processes (dendrites).
[G. axōn, axis]
References in periodicals archive ?
Later in this recording, the action potential initiation zone of both PeD7 axons was in the suction pipette (Fig.
First, sensory nerves promote limited numbers of axons to regenerate (83, 84).
Another paramount process some axons must perform is the crossing to contralateral hemispheres in the brain.
The cell bodies send out axons that descend all the way through the brain towards the spinal cord.
Our most significant findings were (1) disruption and fragmentation of myelin, (2) demyelination with axon sparing, (3) phagocytosis of myelin debris and other degenerating elements by reactive microglia, and (4) proliferation of fibrous astrocytic processes.
Here, we tackle the technical problems of looking at RNA and protein in different regions of motor neurons, including the very important axon, by combining new molecular biology and microscope techniques, with novel mouse model we have made, in an innovative approach to find out what RNA and proteins are pre
"When we implant neural stem cells into sites of spinal cord injury, they extend tens of thousands of axons out of the injury site for distances of up to 50 millmeters," said Tuszynski.
When axons of the peripheral nervous system are injured, Schwann cells rapidly induce the disintegration of the cut-out axonal segments into small fragments, which can then be digested by Schwann cells themselves or later by macrophages.
The doctor noted that the axons grow back slowly depending on the distance they have to cover which makes it difficult for him to say an exact number of days it will take in Irungu's case.
However, this has proven to be very difficult as the amount of RNA in axons is minute.
CRMP2 and CRMP4 Were Expressed in a Retinal Ganglion Cell Layer When Retinal Axons Were Crossing the Midline.
The notion that physical features help guide axons is gaining momentum, says UCLA neuroscientist Samantha Butler.