avian

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Related to Avian pox: Fowl pox, Avipoxvirus

a·vi·an

(ā'vē-ăn),
Pertaining to birds.
[L. avis, bird]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

avian

(ā′vē-ən)
adj.
Of, relating to, or characteristic of birds.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

a·vi·an

(ā'vē-ăn)
Pertaining to birds.
[L. avis, bird]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

Patient discussion about avian

Q. If the bird flu were to reach North America, how many people would it kill? How do you protect yourself & others? What can we do to protect ourselves against the Avian Flu which has officially begun to infect humans? How many will die?

A. It infected few people working with chickens, it can
T move around, so I wouldn’t worry too much. the chances of that happening is the same as a meteor hitting earth and destroying it, same as a nuclear war in the middle east that will wipe out half of humanity, same as all big disasters that can happen.
Unless it’s your job to worry about it (world health organization) – just try to live peaceful life.

More discussions about avian
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References in periodicals archive ?
In conclusion, this case helps to remind clinicians that avian pox should be included on the list of differential disease diagnoses of birds with any multifocal proliferative lesions on the skin.
Avian pox infection was confirmed in the skin examined from the cere and feet of this eagle, and C albicans was seen within numerous thrombosed vessels in the cerebellum.
It had the severe dry form of avian pox, much like that in the present case.
Avian pox. In: Thomas N J, Hunter DB, Atkinson CT, eds.
An isolated case of avian pox in a military macaw (Ara militaris mexicana).
The most convincing indirect evidence that avian pox and malaria have had a major impact on forest bird populations is their strong negative correlation with extant native birds.
A model has been proposed that depicts transmission of avian pox and malaria across an altitudinal gradient on Mauna Loa and Kilauea volcanoes.
Histopathologic examination of the wartlike skin lesions revealed proliferative epithelial cells exhibiting ballooning degeneration with eosinophilic intracytoplasmic inclusion bodies, confirming a diagnosis of avian pox. Another chicken had severe, chronic bacterial pneumonia from a small bacterial rod, most consistent with an enteric organism such as Escherichia coli or possibly Pasteurella multocida.
Because avian pox is not generally thought to be transmitted through unbroken epithelium, it can be speculated that abrasions, perhaps a consequence of the birds flying in the cage, might have provided a route of viral transmission.