avian

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Related to Avian malaria: Plasmodium relictum

a·vi·an

(ā'vē-ăn),
Pertaining to birds.
[L. avis, bird]

avian

(ā′vē-ən)
adj.
Of, relating to, or characteristic of birds.

a·vi·an

(ā'vē-ăn)
Pertaining to birds.
[L. avis, bird]

Patient discussion about avian

Q. If the bird flu were to reach North America, how many people would it kill? How do you protect yourself & others? What can we do to protect ourselves against the Avian Flu which has officially begun to infect humans? How many will die?

A. It infected few people working with chickens, it can
T move around, so I wouldn’t worry too much. the chances of that happening is the same as a meteor hitting earth and destroying it, same as a nuclear war in the middle east that will wipe out half of humanity, same as all big disasters that can happen.
Unless it’s your job to worry about it (world health organization) – just try to live peaceful life.

More discussions about avian
References in periodicals archive ?
Disease screening of three breeding populations of adult exhibition budgerigars (Melopsittacus undulatus) in New Zealand reveals a high prevalence of a novel polyomavirus and avian malaria infection.
When avian malaria reached Hawaii 10 native Europe the UK species were made extinct.
People aren't at risk: The 80-plus species of Plasmodium that cause avian malaria don't infect humans, nor do the five that cause human malaria affect birds.
The researchers also used satellite imagery and other data to determine how far north malaria parasites could survive in the future as global temperatures increase, They concluded that by 2080, avian malaria could spread beyond Coldfoot, leading to the exposure of species with no resistance to the disease.
Avian malaria is common in continental areas, but is often absent from isolated islands where mosquitoes are less prevalent.
The avian malaria parasites identified are highly prevalent in the native songbird population but generally do not cause overt disease or death in their natural hosts.
"And if a mosquito slips through, it will be only a matter of days before West Nile is all over the island," Daszak says, noting that avian malaria has already wiped out a third of the endemic bird species in Hawaii.
Avian malaria. In: Atkinson CT, Thomas N J, Hunter DB, eds.
The source of the avian malaria is being investigated.
Although specific diseases will vary by host species and location, emerging and re-emerging vector-borne diseases (such as poxvirus and avian malaria) are spreading to new areas through animal trade and vector introductions and range expansion due to climate change.
Annual epizootics of avian pox (Avipoxvirus) and avian malaria (Plasmodium relictum) likely led to the extinction of some species and continue to impact populations of susceptible Hawaiian honeycreepers (Drepanidinae).