autotroph

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autotroph

 [aw´to-trōf]
an autotrophic organism.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

au·to·troph

(aw'tō-trōf),
A microorganism that uses only inorganic materials as its source of nutrients; carbon dioxide is the autotroph's sole carbon source.
[auto- + G. trophē, nourishment]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

autotroph

(ô′tə-trŏf′, -trōf′)
n.
An organism capable of synthesizing its own food from inorganic substances, using light or chemical energy. Green plants, algae, and certain bacteria are autotrophs.

au′to·troph′ic adj.
au′to·troph′i·cal·ly adv.
au·tot′ro·phy (ô-tŏt′rə-fē) n.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

au·to·troph

(aw'tō-trōf)
A microorganism that uses only inorganic materials as its source of nutrients; carbon dioxide serves as the sole carbon source.
[auto- + G. trophē, nourishment]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

autotroph

an organism that can manufacture its own organic requirements from inorganic materials independent of other sources of organic substrates. Autotrophs are either phototrophic (see PHOTOAUTOTROPH or CHEMOAUTOTROPHIC, energy being derived either by photosynthesis where chlorophyll is present, or from inorganic oxidation where it is absent (e.g. hydrogen sulphide is oxidized by sulphur bacteria). Autotrophs are primary producers (see PRIMARY PRODUCTION). Compare HETEROTROPH.
Collins Dictionary of Biology, 3rd ed. © W. G. Hale, V. A. Saunders, J. P. Margham 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
It is possible that bacterial densities were reduced through action of antibacterial compounds present in the autotrophs used in the treatment diets.
However, those authors also implicated size differences between herbivores and autotrophs as important predictors of the strength of trophic cascades (see also DeLong et al.
Autotrophs, as you probably know, were among the first species of life on this planet and created their own food through photosynthesis, using sunlight to turn carbon dioxide and water into useful organic compounds such as sugars.
Flow enhances photosynthesis in marine benthic autotrophs by increasing the efflux of oxygen from the organism to the water.
Populations living near landfills can be exposed to heavy metals while eating chemically saturated autotrophs; later they may face serious health complications because the inefficiency of oxygen transportation.
More precisely, plants and all other autotrophs use carbon dioxide as their principal nutrient source.
(29) Production functions pertain to the creation of ecosystem goods through photosynthesis and nutrient uptake by autotrophs. These functions create a wide variety of carbohydrate structures, many of which provide goods for human consumption, ranging from food to raw materials to energy resources.
thermosufatus) culture using medium-A enriched with elemental sulfur, which does not support the development of other autotrophs (Temple and Colmer, 1951; Tuovinen and Kelly, 1974).
Autotrophs, mangrove detritus, seagrass, and particulate organic matter play a pivotal role as important sources of nutrition for juvenile gray snapper (Melville and Connolly, 2003).
Therefore, autotrophs provide food for the heterotrophs; plants are the producers.
These bacteria are slow-growing autotrophs. A large advantage of the Anammox process is that it does not require an organic carbon source to remove nitrogen from water.