autosome

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Related to Autosomes: Down syndrome, meiosis

autosome

 [aw´to-sōm]
any of the 22 pairs of chromosomes in humans other than the pair concerned with determination of sex.

au·to·some

(aw'tō-sōm),
Any chromosome other than a sex chromosome; autosomes normally occur in pairs in somatic cells and singly in gametes.
Synonym(s): euchromosome
[auto- + G. sōma, body]

autosome

/au·to·some/ (-sōm) any non–sex-determining chromosome; in humans there are 22 pairs of autosomes.autoso´mal

autosome

(ô′tə-sōm′)
n.
A chromosome that is not a sex chromosome.

au′to·so′mal (-sō′məl) adj.
au′to·so′mal·ly adv.

autosome

[ô′təsōm]
any chromosome that is not a sex chromosome and that appears as a homologous pair in a somatic cell. Humans have 22 pairs of autosomes, which transmit all genetic traits and conditions other than those that are sex-linked. Also called euchromosome [yoo′krōməsōm] . Compare sex chromosome. autosomal, adj.

autosome

A non-sex (non-X, non-Y) chromosome which in normal humans is one of 22 pairs of chromosomes.

autosome

Cytogenetics Any chromosome in an organism's complement–22 pairs in humans–other than sex chromosomes, X and Y See Chromosome, Diploid, Genome. Cf Sex chromosome.

au·to·some

(aw'tō-sōm)
Any chromosome other than a sex chromosome; autosomes normally occur in pairs in somatic cells and singly in gametes.
[auto- + G. sōma, body]

autosome

Any one of the ordinary paired CHROMOSOMES other than the sex chromosomes.

autosome

a type of chromosome found in all cells not concerned with SEX DETERMINATION. Chromosomes are of two types: autosomes and SEX CHROMOSOMES. Autosomes carry the major part of genetic information in cells, including information on sexual characteristics. See SEX LINKAGE for a comparison of the inheritance of autosomal and sex-linked genes.

Autosome

A chromosome not involved in sex determination.
Mentioned in: Peroxisomal Disorders

autosome

any chromosome other than the sex chromosomes.
References in periodicals archive ?
Most X; autosome carriers may present with a variable phenotype, developmental delay, and recognizable X-linked syndrome due to nonrandom X-inactivation.
The complement includes seven pairs of large and medium-sized metacentric, five pairs of submetacentric (the first two are the largest elements of the set), two pairs of subtelocentric (the first pair is among the largest in the set, the others are of medium size) and eight pairs of small acrocentric autosomes.
Table 3 shows the frequency of the Q-HRs in seven Q-polymorphic autosomes in the samples studied.
However, human mtDNA and Y chromosomes have only about one-tenth of the diversity expected from the equivalent chimp values and the autosomes.
The chromosome number of Angora goat was 2n=60, in which 29 pairs autosomes were all telocentric chromosomes.
A chromosome portrait involves probing autosomes (chromosome pairs excluding the sex chromosomes) for specific genes with single nucleotide polymorphisms that correspond to one of "three continental origins" (Asia, Africa and Europe).
Chromosomal breaks and/or gaps affecting autosomes and sex chromosomes were seen in 5 of a total of 14 cases.
Autosomes are the remaining 22 pairs of chromosomes.
The frequencies of particular gene arrangements on the four autosomes changed significantly in the samples maintained on medium not supplemented with lead.
Of these, 44 are known as autosomes and consist of matched pairs of chromosomes, known as homologous chromosomes.
All the autosomes are biarmed (8 metacentric, m; and 2 submetacentric pairs, sm), meanwhile the X and Y are acrocentrics (a).