dysautonomia

(redirected from Autonomic dysfunction)
Also found in: Encyclopedia.

dysautonomia

 [dis″aw-to-no´me-ah]
malfunction of the autonomic nervous system.
familial dysautonomia Riley-Day syndrome.

dys·au·to·no·mi·a

(dis'aw-tō-nō'mē-ă),
Abnormal functioning of the autonomic nervous system.
[dys- + G. autonomia, self-government]

dysautonomia

/dys·au·to·no·mia/ (-aw-to-no´me-ah) malfunction of the autonomic nervous system.
familial dysautonomia  an inherited disorder of childhood characterized by defective lacrimation, skin blotching, emotional instability, motor incoordination, absence of pain sensation, and hyporeflexia; occurring almost exclusively in Ashkenazi Jews.

dysautonomia

[disô′tənō′mē·ə]
Etymology: Gk, dys + autonomia, self-government
an autosomal-recessive disease of childhood characterized by defective lacrimation, skin blotching, emotional instability, motor incoordination, total absence of pain sensation, and hyporeflexia, seen almost exclusively in Ashkenazi Jews. Also called familial autonomic dysfunction, familial dysautonomia, Riley-Day syndrome.

IKBKAP

A gene on chromosome 9q31 that encodes a putative scaffold protein which may assemble active IKK-MAP3K14 complexes and act as subunit of the RNA polymerase II elongator complex, a histone acetyltransferase component of the RNA polymerase II (Pol II) holoenzyme involved in transcriptional elongation. The elongator complex may play a role in chromatin remodelling; it may be involved in acetylation of histone H3 and possibly also H4.

Molecular pathology
Defects in IKBKAP cause familial dysautonomia, also known as hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathy type 3, or Riley-Day syndrome.

dysautonomia

Neurology Any condition characterized by sympathetic or parasympathetic derangements; autonomic hypofunction or failure is most often caused by drugs and disease-associated polyneuropathies–eg, DM and amyloidosis, but may be idiopathic Classifications Primary dysautonomia system, sanctioned by the American Academy of Neurology; Goldstein classification. See Familial dysautonomia aka Riley-Day syndrome.

dys·au·to·no·mi·a

(dis'aw-tō-nō'mē-ă)
Abnormal functioning of the autonomic nervous system.
[dys- + G. autonomia, self-government]

dysautonomia (disˈ·ˈ·t·n·mēˑ·),

n in the three-dimensional chiropractic assessment model, dysfunction in the autonomic and sensory nervous systems resulting from incomplete development of the neurons. It is evaluated by taking skin temperature readings.

dys·au·to·no·mi·a

(dis'aw-tō-nō'mē-ă)
Abnormal functioning of autonomic nervous system.
[dys- + G. autonomia, self-government]

dysautonomia

dysfunction of the autonomic nervous system. See also grass sickness.

feline dysautonomia
a dysfunction of the autonomic nervous system in cats characterized by constipation, megaesophagus with regurgitation, dilated pupils, protrusion of the nictitating membranes, dry nasal and buccal mucosae, reduced laryngeal secretions and bradycardia. Seen almost exclusively in the United Kingdom; the cause is unknown. Called also Key-Gaskell syndrome, dilated pupil syndrome, feline autonomic polyganglionopathy.

Patient discussion about dysautonomia

Q. What is dysautonomia? My friend has dysautonomia. What does it mean? What are the symptoms? Is it curable?

A. Dysautonomia is any disease or malfunction of the autonomic nervous system. The symptoms of dysautonomia conditions are usually “invisible” to the untrained eye. The child can appear to be as healthy as other children. The manifestations are occurring internally, and although the symptoms are often are not visible on the outside. Symptoms can be unpredictable, may come and go, appear in any combination, and may vary in severity).There is no cure for dysautonomia. There are medications to assist in stabilization, but are often needed on a long-term basis.

More discussions about dysautonomia
References in periodicals archive ?
Autonomic dysfunction and adrenocortical unresponsiveness to ACTH.
Pattern of autonomic dysfunction in time course of complex regional pain syndrome.
Prozac, Zoloft, and Dexedrine have all been shown to help autonomic dysfunction.
Studies in the literature have investigated the relationship between autoinflammatory diseases and cardiac autonomic dysfunction.
Signs and symptoms of autonomic dysfunction commonly present in the primary care setting.
The autonomic dysfunction was treated successfully with a combination of morphine sulphate infusion (27 mg/day as constant infusion), magnesium sulphate (16.
sup][1],[2],[3] A large of researches demonstrated that autonomic dysfunction differs according to the stroke stage,[sup][4],[5],[6] ischemic location,[sup][7],[8] and ischemic subtype.
LEMS is a rare autoimmune disease with primary symptoms of muscle weakness, fatigue, muscle aches and autonomic dysfunction, such as impotence, dry mouth and constipation.
These features, which include cutaneous flushing, certain chronic pain disorders, autonomic dysfunction, and gastrointestinal dysmotility, have been associated with genetic disorders or joint hypermobility syndromes.
Non-motor Parkinson's symptoms include autonomic dysfunction, cognitive-neurobehavioral disorders, sleep disturbance, and loss of sense of smell (anosmia) (Nolden et al.
Anti-N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor encephalitis is an autoimmune syndrome that presents with personality changes, autonomic dysfunction, and neurologic deterioration.

Full browser ?