autoantibody

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autoantibody

 [aw″to-an´tĭ-bod″e]
an antibody formed in response to, and reacting against, an antigenic constituent of the individual's own tissues.

au·to·an·ti·bod·y

(aw'tō-an'ti-bod-ē),
An antibody that occurs in response to antigenic constituents of the host's tissue (or "self antigen") and reacts with the inciting target tissue.

autoantibody

/au·to·an·ti·body/ (-an´tĭ-bod″e) an antibody formed in response to, and reacting against, an antigenic constituent of one's own tissues.

autoantibody

(ô′tō-ăn′tĭ-bŏd′ē)
n.
An antibody that reacts with the cells, tissues, or native proteins of the individual in which it is produced.

autoantibody

[ô′tō·an′tibod′ē]
Etymology: Gk, autos + anti, against; AS, bodig, body
an immunoglobulin produced by a person that recognizes an antigen on that person's own tissues. Several mechanisms may trigger the production of autoantibodies: an antigen, formed during fetal development and then sequestered, may be released as a result of infection, chemical exposure, or trauma, as occurs in autoimmune thyroiditis, sympathetic uveitis, and aspermia; there may be disorders of immune regulatory or surveillance function; antibodies produced against certain streptococcal antigens during infection may cross-react with myocardial tissue, causing rheumatic heart disease, or with glomerular basement membrane, causing glomerulonephritis; and normal body proteins may be converted to autoantigens by chemicals, infectious organisms, or therapeutic drugs. Some examples of autoantibodies are those found against gastric parietal cells in pernicious anemia, against platelets in autoimmune thrombocytopenia, and against antigens on the surface of erythrocytes in autoimmune hemolytic anemia. There is growing evidence that genetic factors increase the incidence and severity of autoimmune diseases.

autoantibody

Any antibody produced by an organism against one of its own—self-antigens.

Autoantibodies
Examples of autoantibodies and disease associations
• Anti-actin antibodies—coeliac disease.
• Anti-centromere antibodies—CREST syndrome.
• Anti-ganglioside antibodies—acute motor neuronal neuropathy.
• Antimitochondrial antibody—primary biliary cirrhosis.
• Anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody—Wegener’s granulomatosis (in neutrophil cytoplasm).
• Anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody—Churg-Strauss syndrome, microscopic polyangiitis, systemic vasculitides (perinuclear location).
• Anti-nuclear antibodies (e.g., anti-SSA/Ro)—systemic lupus erythematosus.
• Anti-signal recognition peptide—polymyositis.
• Anti-smooth muscle antibody—chronic autoimmune hepatitis.
• Anti-glomerular basement membrane antibodies.
• Anti-parietal cell antibodies, and others.
• Anti-nuclear antibodies (ANA).
• Anti-smooth muscle actin (SMA).
• Anti-liver-kidney-microsomal antibody (LKM), 2 types:
   - Anti-mitochondrial (AMA);
   - Perinuclear antineutrophil cytoplasmic (pANCA).
• Anti-soluble liver antigen (SLA), other autoantibodies.
• ANA and SMAs are known to be positive in AIH, PBC, PSC, HCV, HBV, HDV, NASH, drug-induced hepatitis.

autoantibody

Immunology Any antibody produced by an organism against one of its own–self antigens. See Antibody, Hashimoto's thyroiditis, Lupus erythematosus, Myasthenia gravis, Rheumatoid arthritis.

au·to·an·ti·body

(aw'tō-an'ti-bod-ē)
Antibody occurring in response to antigenic constituents of the host's tissue, and which reacts with the inciting tissue component.

autoantibody

An antibody derived from the immune system, which then acts against body tissues or constituents.

Autoantibody

An antibody produced by the body in reaction to any of its own cells or cell products.

au·to·an·ti·body

(aw'tō-an'ti-bod-ē)
Antibody occurring in response to antigenic constituents of the host's tissue, and which reacts with the inciting tissue component.

autoantibody

an antibody formed in response to, and reacting against, an antigenic constituent of the animal's own cells or tissues.
References in periodicals archive ?
Patients with some hypersensitivity conditions (asthma; chronic urticaria (CU); CU+angioedema; and multiple drug hypersensitivity (MDH) aka multiple drug "allergy" syndrome) have an increased frequency of HT-related autoantibodies and/or ANA.
Pristane-induced lupus mouse model is one of the SLE models, which develops a repertoire of autoantibodies and immune complex mediated glomerulonephritis (Wang et al.
genavense infection resulting from neutralizing anti-IFN-[gamma] autoantibodies in the patient.
20,28) investigated the presence of CA autoantibodies in the etiopathogenesis of type 1 diabetes in two separate studies.
Investigation of neuronal autoantibodies in two different focal epilepsy syndromes.
Most commercial cTnI assays use antibodies to the stable midfragment of cTnI and thus are susceptible to troponin autoantibodies (7).
The correlations between anti-SmD1[sub]83-119 antibody and other autoantibodies were investigated using 46 cSLE patients.
Regarding thyroid autoimmunity, transcripts for TPO (and thyroglobulin, Tg) are required for thyroid hormone synthesis in the thyroid gland but it is also expressed in the endometrium; the latter is thus susceptible to the action of anti-TPO and anti-Tg autoantibodies (10).
5%) tested positive for glutamic acid decarboxylase autoantibodies compared to 15(25%) in type 2 diabetics, 6(15%) among relatives of type 1, 7(11.
Even though to date only autoantibodies to vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-2 have been reported in a glioblastoma patient [15], all the proteins from the vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) family are potential TAA because of their crucial role in tumor growth.
The RBC autoantibodies can have varied clinical importance, ranging from insignificant to life-threatening AIHA.
The company said OBIZUR [Antihemophilic Factor (Recombinant), Porcine Sequence] has been approved in Canada for the treatment of bleeding episodes in patients with acquired hemophilia A caused by autoantibodies to coagulation Factor VIII (FVIII), a very rare and life-threatening acute bleeding disorder.