author

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author

The writer of an article, chapter, or other complete written work.
Many articles, proceedings, or books have multiple authors; the names of the authors following the first author are known as co-authors. Corporations, government agencies, and associations may also be listed as authors of a work.

author

Journalism A person involved in writing a manuscript

au·thor

(aw'thŏr)
medical transcription Person who orally creates a report to be transcribed.
Synonym(s): dictator, originator.
References in classic literature ?
If the author, who finds himself limited to a particular class of subjects, endeavours to sustain his reputation by striving to add a novelty of attraction to themes of the same character which have been formerly successful under his management, there are manifest reasons why, after a certain point, he is likely to fail.
It is not, perhaps, necessary to enumerate so many reasons why the author of the Scottish Novels, as they were then exclusively termed, should be desirous to make an experiment on a subject purely English.
In like manner, the excellence of the mental entertainment consists less in the subject than in the author's skill in well dressing it up.
Although the settlement of this part of Otsego a little preceded the birth of the author, it was not sufficiently advanced to render it desirable that an event so important to himself should take place in the wilderness.
But the author indulged his recollections freely when he had fairly entered the door.
Beginning in Boston, they were continued in a Boston suburb, on the shores of Lake George, in a Western New York health resort, in Buffalo, in Nahant; once, twice, and thrice in New York, with reversions to Boston, and summer excursions to the hills and waters of New England, until it seemed that their author had at last said his say, and he voluntarily lapsed into silence with the applause of friends and enemies alike.
His opinions were always impersonal; and now as their manner rather than their make has been slightly tempered, it may surprise the belated reader to learn that it was the belief of one English critic that their author had "placed himself beyond the pale of decency" by them.
There are some things related in the narrative which will be sure to appear strange, or perhaps entirely incomprehensible, to the reader; but they cannot appear more so to him than they did to the author at the time.
That, the author declares, is one of the principal aims of this book; it is one of the principal aims of his life.
But the author is far from regarding as accomplished, the task which he has voluntarily imposed on himself.
"It has afforded the Author great amusement and satisfaction, during the progress of this work, to learn, from country friends and from a variety of ludicrous statements concerning himself in provincial newspapers, that more than one Yorkshire schoolmaster lays claim to being the original of Mr.
"While the Author cannot but feel the full force of the compliment thus conveyed to him, he ventures to suggest that these contentions may arise from the fact, that Mr.