Australopithecus


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Related to Australopithecus: Australopithecus africanus

Australopithecus

a genus of early Pleistocene primate that was hominid in some features but ape-like in others, such as the skull. Southern African in origin, Australopithecus was upright in posture.
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It's likely that Australopithecus anamensis walked on the ground at times too, but Macho points out that "form follows function.
Ardipithecus evolved into an initial Australopithecus species by 4.
Using this method, he analysed a dozen Australopithecus skulls.
2-million-year-old fossil from East Africa suggests Australopithecus afarensis, best known from the partial skeleton "Lucy," had stiff foot arches like those of people today, a sign of a two-legged stride (SN: 3/12/11, p.
Dirks said Australopithecus sediba is one of the most important discoveries in the human family tree as it contains features of both the Australopithecine and Homo species.
Others regard the Malapa fossils either as an early Homo species or as late-surviving members of Australopithecus africanus, a dead-end hominid species that lived from about 3 million to 2.
sediba shares more features with early Homo specimens than any other known Australopithecus species does, said Darryl de Ruiter of Texas A&M University in College Station.
Controversially, the researchers have named the fossils as a new species, Australopithecus sediba.
Based on previous analyses of the skeletons of Australopithecus afarensis, we expected that the Laetoli footprints would resemble those of someone walking with a bent knee, bent hip gait typical of chimpanzees, and not the striding gait normally used by modern humans," Raichlen said.
8 million-year-old vertebrae of Australopithecus africanus recovered in South Africa has revealed signs of a bacterial infection, which means it is the world's earliest human infection.
The University of the Witwatersrand displayed the virtually complete Australopithecus fossil on Wednesday.
Using CT scan technology, they say Lucy, who was of the Australopithecus afarensis species, likely plunged to her death from a height of 40 feet, suffering fractures from her ankles to her jaw.