Australopithecus

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Australopithecus

a genus of early Pleistocene primate that was hominid in some features but ape-like in others, such as the skull. Southern African in origin, Australopithecus was upright in posture.
References in periodicals archive ?
(93) Modern chimpanzees have about the same EQ (about 2.45) as did the early australopithecines. The later species, A.
Cultural inventiveness enabled our immediate ancestors to evade some environmental limitations, such as hunting and cooking that allowed them to adopt a diet different from that of the australopithecines, while clothing and housing permitted them to colonize both drier and colder regions of planet Earth.
Historically the human lineage, evidently only at some point in the past in the Australopithecines, assumed obligatory upright posture.
Although now recognized as belonging to a crucial family of early humans, the australopithecines, it contradicted many accepted tenets of human evolution.
Taxonomic and geographic diversity in robust australopithecines and other African PlioPleistocene larger mammals.
Among Paranthropus boisei's close relatives are the Australopithecines, which also gave rise to humans.
australopithecines possessed language 2-3 mya, but there is no hard evidence that excludes it.
Studies on fossil remains of hominids have revealed degenerative joint disease in Australopithecus africanus (Reed, K.E., 1993) and an ailment resembling Scheuermann disease in modern humans among the Afar australopithecines (Cook, D.C., 1983).
The lush region in east and central Africa that sustained australopithecines dried out, and the fruits, leaves, tubers, and seeds that were once abundant disappeared, as did fresh water.
Look at this issue: Examine the anatomy of australopithecines as an evolutionary intermediate and as evidence of the evolutionary process.
Bipedal locomotion--walking on two legs--according to Hrdy, "bit the dust with the discovery of a fossilized trail of bipedal footprints left in volcano ash by australopithecines"--a four-million-year-old species that most anthropologists classify as a member of the human lineage, but that according to Hrdy was an ape with a brain "no bigger than a chimpanzee's." (Chimpanzees are humans' closest living relatives, and the two share a common ancestor with gorillas.
A critical analysis of claims for the existence of Southeast Asian australopithecines. Journal of Human Evolution.