Auger effect

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Related to Auger electrons: Auger electron spectroscopy

Auger effect

A phenomenon of nuclear physics, in which loss or removal of a core electron in an atom leaves an inner-shell vacancy. This results in the transition of an electron from an outer shell at a higher energy to the inner shell with the release of energy either as a photon or to another electron (Auger electron), which is kicked out of the atom.
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Auger electrons typically have energies in the 50-2200 eV range and a spectrum is shown as a plot of electron intensity as a function of electron energy.
The numbers of emitted Auger electrons from a given chemical element are proportional to the concentration of that element at the sample surface.
An examination of the surface using Auger Electron Spectroscopy indicated that high levels of nickel and oxygen were present compared to as-plated samples.
of Cincinnati, announced that he had successfully measured complete angular distributions of Auger electrons from known structures for several elements.
Egelhoff, whose research specialty is photoelectron diffraction, argued that his own research shows that atoms do not block the Auger electrons, but rather focus them.
Many researchers have noted that the number of Auger electrons measured varies as the electron detector's angular view of the sample changes.
Of these techniques, three main instruments have evolved: X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), Auger electron spectroscopy (AES), and secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS).
A custom-designed analytical system that combines scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive x-ray (EDX) spectroscopy, and Auger electron spectroscopy (AES) enables us to accomplish these goals.