Auger effect

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Auger effect

A phenomenon of nuclear physics, in which loss or removal of a core electron in an atom leaves an inner-shell vacancy. This results in the transition of an electron from an outer shell at a higher energy to the inner shell with the release of energy either as a photon or to another electron (Auger electron), which is kicked out of the atom.
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References in periodicals archive ?
The chemical elements as a function of depth after maraging were analyzed by Auger Electron Spectroscopy (AES) to investigate the reasons for the coloration of the surf aces of the samples.
The samples surfaces were analyzed by Auger Electron Spectroscopy for the chemical composition of the material and its hardness values are reported here.
Auger electron spectroscopy (AES) has been widely used in the investigation of carbon bonds in carbon based materials thin films because the main peak of the carbon Auger transition involves valence states [4-13].
X-ray Excited Auger Electron Spectroscopy (XAES), on the other hand, seems to play a better role in the analysis of electronic structure, allowing more precise interpretations of the fine structure of the spectra.
In addition, attempts to utilize radionuclides emitting [alpha]-ray ([sup.211]At, [sup.213]Bi) and auger electron ([sup.99m]Tc, [sup.111]In, and [sup.125]I) are also performed (Table 1) [21-25].
Auger electron spectroscopy (AES) is one of the most fundamental techniques in surface science providing chemical, growth mode, and coverage information [1, 2].
Auger electrons typically have energies in the 50-2200 eV range and a spectrum is shown as a plot of electron intensity as a function of electron energy.
An examination of the surface using Auger Electron Spectroscopy indicated that high levels of nickel and oxygen were present compared to as-plated samples.
of Cincinnati, announced that he had successfully measured complete angular distributions of Auger electrons from known structures for several elements.
Many researchers have noted that the number of Auger electrons measured varies as the electron detector's angular view of the sample changes.
Of these techniques, three main instruments have evolved: X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), Auger electron spectroscopy (AES), and secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS).
PHOTO : William Traber of the IBM General Products Div.'s materials laboratory adjusts the Auger electron energy spectrometer (C) in the whole-disk analyzer.