Auer rod


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Auer rod

[ou′ər]
Etymology: John Auer, American physiologist, 1875-1948
an abnormal, needle-shaped or round, pink-staining inclusion in the cytoplasm of myeloblasts and promyelocytes in acute myelogenous, promyelocytic, or myelomonocytic leukemia. These inclusions contain enzymes such as acid phosphatase, peroxidase, and esterase and may represent abnormal derivatives of cytoplasmic granules. The finding of Auer rods in stained blood smears helps to differentiate acute myelogenous leukemia from acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Also called Auer body.
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Auer rod

Auer rod

A pink, round or rod-shaped, splinter- or “jackstraw”-like inclusion seen in the cytoplasm of lymphoblasts in immature granulocytes, and occasionally in monocyte precursors in the peripheral circulation of 10% to 30% of patients with acute non-lymphocytic leukaemias and acute promyelocytic leukaemia. ARs correspond to azurophilic granules with dysplastic lysosomes; cells with multiple AR bundles are known as faggot cells.
References in periodicals archive ?
Cytoplasmic blebbing in blasts of all cases, cytoplasmic vacoulation was seen in three cases, nuclear clefting in one, auer rod in one while giant platelets and aggregates of blasts were found in case IV.
Hutter G, Nowak D, Blau IW, Thiel E: Auer rod like intracytoplasmic inclusions in multiple myeloma.
In one survey, the CAP received the following five different identifications on a hematology slide: segmented neutrophil, Auer rod, toxic granulation, Barr body, and Dohle inclusion body.
Morphology showed normochromic, anisocytosis, Rouleaux formation, circulating blast cells with Auer rods, bicytopenia with leukocytosis, neutrophils: 0.
Faggot cells with multiple Auer rods are less commonly seen.
2] Characteristic cells containing bundles of Auer rods (faggots) randomly distributed in the cytoplasm are almost invariably present in the bone marrow and sometimes in the peripheral blood.
A cytochemical and ultrastructural study of acute myelomonocytic leukemia exhibiting the pseudo-Chediak-Higashi anomaly of leukemia and "splinter-type" Auer rods.
0% Platelets 30 K/[mu]L 150-450 K/[mu]L Differential Neutrophils 3% 33-61% Lymphocytes 10% 25-45% Blasts 87% 0% Nucleated RBC's 2 RBC Morphology Polychromasia WBC Morphology Auer rods present D-Dimer 18.
Hypergranular acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL): The most common morphologic variant of APL, representing approximately 75% of cases, is characterized by bone marrow containing large, abnormal promyelocytes with pleomorphic nucleoi and cytoplasm containing coarse, large granules with abundant Auer rods, often in bundles.
In the typical case of APL, diagnosis is not difficult, as the neoplastic population consists of numerous cytologically atypical cells that resemble promyelocytes, frequently containing single or multiple Auer rods (Figure 1, A).
Occasional blasts, especially the more mature forms, may contain blunted Auer rods (Figure B).
Morphological tinclings of pathological "clonal" blasts (type II that contain Auer rods, Pseudo-Chediak-Higashi or other specific inclusions that are not seen in reactive marrow) refer to the diagnosis of RAEB-2 or AML; here again the arbitrary cut-off point of 20% blasts results in a specific diagnosis.