Hallucination

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Related to Auditory hallucinations: schizophrenia

hallucination

 [hah-loo″sĭ-na´shun]
a sensory impression (sight, touch, sound, smell, or taste) that has no basis in external stimulation. Hallucinations can have psychologic causes, as in mental illness, or they can result from drugs, alcohol, organic illnesses, such as brain tumor or senility, or exhaustion. When hallucinations have a psychologic origin, they usually represent a disguised form of a repressed conflict. adj. adj hallu´cinative, hallu´cinatory.
auditory hallucination a hallucination of hearing; the most common type.
gustatory hallucination a hallucination of taste.
haptic hallucination tactile hallucination.
hypnagogic hallucination a vivid, dreamlike hallucination occurring at sleep onset.
hypnopompic hallucination a vivid, dreamlike hallucination occurring on awakening.
kinesthetic hallucination a hallucination involving the sense of bodily movement.
olfactory hallucination a hallucination of smell.
somatic hallucination a hallucination involving the perception of a physical experience occurring within the body.
tactile hallucination a hallucination of touch.
visual hallucination a hallucination of sight.

hal·lu·ci·na·tion

(ha-lū-si-nā'shŭn), Do not confuse this word with delusion or illusion.
The apparent, often strong subjective perception of an external object or event when no such stimulus or situation is present; may be visual, auditory, olfactory, gustatory, or tactile.
[L. alucinor, to wander in mind]

hallucination

(hə-lo͞o′sə-nā′shən)
n.
1.
a. Perception of visual, auditory, tactile, olfactory, or gustatory stimuli in the absence of any external objects or events and with a compelling sense of their reality, resulting from certain mental and physical disorders or as a response to a drug.
b. The objects or events so perceived.
2. A false or mistaken idea.

hal·lu′ci·na′tion·al, hal·lu′ci·na′tive adj.
A complex sensory perception that occurs without external stimulation, which is characterised by false or distorted perception of objects or events—e.g., sights, sounds, tastes, smells, or sensations of touch—often accompanied by a powerful sense of reality

hallucination

Neurology A complex sensory perception that occurs without external stimulation, characterized by false or distorted perception of objects or events–eg, sights, sounds, tastes, smells, or sensations of touch, often accompanied by a powerful sense of reality. See Command, Functional, Hypnogenic, Hypnopompic, Olfactory hallucination. Cf Illusion, Schizophrenia.

hal·lu·ci·na·tion

(hă-lū'si-nā'shŭn)
The subjective perception of an object or event when no such stimulus or situation is present; may be visual, auditory, olfactory, gustatory, or tactile.
[L. alucinor, to wander in mind]

hallucination

A sense perception in the absence of an external cause. Hallucinations may involve sights (visual hallucinations), sounds (auditory), smells (olfactory), tastes (gustatory), touch (tactile) or size (dimensional). Hallucinations should be distinguished from delusions-which are mistaken ideas.

Hallucination

A sensory experience of something that does not exist outside the mind. A person can experience a hallucination in any of the five senses. Auditory hallucinations are a common symptom of schizophrenia.

hal·lu·ci·na·tion

(hă-lū'si-nā'shŭn) Do not confuse this word with delusion or illusion.
Apparent, often strong subjective perception of an external object or event when no such stimulus or situation is present.
[L. alucinor, to wander in mind]

Patient discussion about Hallucination

Q. Give life to her please! Here is a really confusing question to you all. But your reply is a life for her. I know someone who is bipolar and she thinks that her ‘brother’ sexually molested her when they were kids. Can this be a delusion? Or hallucinating?

A. Im going to answer this question a little different;What if she is telling the truth,and her brother is planning on no body believing her? because she has this disease?---keep that in mind when you take her to the DR--mrfoot56

More discussions about Hallucination
References in periodicals archive ?
Auditory hallucinations in schizophrenia and non-schizophrenia populations: a review and integrated model of cognitive mechanisms.
Is chronicity a function of the relationship between the person and the auditory hallucinations? Schizophrenia Bulletin, 15, 291-310.
Normally, these are critical components I consider in developing treatment plans for psychotic symptoms such as auditory hallucinations. Are my typical Christian cognitive behavioral strategies adequate for her case?
In DLB, delusions and auditory hallucinations tended to occur only in those with visual hallucinations.
Even more importantly, it is simply crass to equate Homer's divine voices with the auditory hallucinations of modern psychiatry.
Ken Steele, an apparently normal boy in a blue-collar family in Connecticut, was fourteen when his auditory hallucinations started, without warning.
The available evidence from all over the world does not show much variation in the frequency of auditory hallucinations, but there have been inconsistent reports regarding the prevalence of visual and other types of hallucinations.
Paranoia and visual, tactile and auditory hallucinations are often a result of long-term sleep deprivation.
When Clean, Shaven was screened in New York at New Directors/New Films seven years ago, a discomfited audience viscerally experienced the terrifying auditory hallucinations that torment the mentally imbalanced protagonist, who may or may not have committed a murder.
At times, when recounting the primal scene, Beloved experiences visual and auditory hallucinations which seem to transport her back to the ship.
All of the symptoms identified as common by previous retrospective studies occurred frequently, although only visual hallucinations, auditory hallucinations, delusions, disturbed consciousness and parkinsonism were significantly more common in patients with DLB than those with AD (Table 1).
One of the subjects exhibited auditory hallucinations (hearing voices), while the other four developed other forms of delusions.