attitude

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attitude

 [at´ĭ-to̳d]
1. a posture or position of the body; in obstetrics, the relation of the various parts of the fetal body to one another.
2. a pattern of mental views established by cumulative prior experience.

at·ti·tude

(at'i-tūd),
1. Position of the body and limbs.
2. Manner of acting.
3. social or clinical psychology a relatively stable and enduring predisposition to behave or react in a certain way toward people, objects, institutions, or issues.
[Mediev. L. aptitudo, fr. L. aptus, fit]

attitude

/at·ti·tude/ (at´ĭ-tldbomacd)
1. a position of the body; in obstetrics, the relation of the various parts of the fetal body.
2. a pattern of mental views established by cumulative prior experience.

attitude

[at′ətyo̅o̅d, -to̅o̅d]
Etymology: L, aptitude, fitness
1 a body position or posture, particularly the fetal position in the uterus, as determined by the degree of flexion of the head and extremities.
2 (in psychiatry) any of the major integrative forces in the development of personality that gives consistency to an individual's behavior. Attitudes are cognitive in nature, formed through interactions with the environment. They reflect the person's innermost convictions about situations good or bad, right or wrong, desirable or undesirable.

attitude

Anatomy
The position and relation of the body and body parts to each other, i.e., posture.

Psychology
A mental disposition or mindset. Attitude is a tendency, based on one’s beliefs and experience, to react to events in certain ways and approach or avoid events that confirm or challenge personal values.

attitude

Psychology “…the tendency towards a mode of response, toward the object in question.” See Abstract attitude.

at·ti·tude

(at'i-tūd)
1. Position of the body and limbs.
2. Manner of acting.
3. psychology A predisposition to behave or react in a certain way toward people, objects, institutions, or issues.
[Mediev. L. aptitudo, fr. L. aptus, fit]

attitude

a relatively enduring evaluative reaction to other individuals, situations or objects, which may be positive or negative. Typically defined as comprising affective cognitive and behavioural components.

at·ti·tude

(at'i-tūd)
1. Position of the body and limbs.
2. Manner of behavior.
[Mediev. L. aptitudo, fr. L. aptus, fit]

attitude

a posture or position of the body; in obstetrics, the relation of the various parts of the fetal body to one another. See also posture.
References in periodicals archive ?
In addition, the only classroom event to occur between the pre- and post-test was the viewing of a film in which an innocent man is executed, making it easier to pinpoint the event that triggered the attitude change.
Attitude change was found to be more strongly associated with sense of responsibility for the participants in the high-responsibility group than for those in the moderate-responsibility group and, similarly, in the moderate-responsibility group attitude change was more strongly associated with sense of responsibility than it was among the participants in the low-responsibility group.
Professionals currently using VIPs could add to the research literature by focusing on measuring the panels' effectiveness in terms of attitude change as well as decreasing recidivism rates.
A second reason for attitude change to accompany mandated use of technology is that participants required to use technology gain a better understanding of the benefits of such usage.
Immediate results would occur because the attitude change addresses present challenges and targets resources to meet them.
On the whole, our purpose in this research was twofold: (1) to examine both internal and external motivation from a cognitive-oriented motive viewpoint, and identify student motivations for participating in certificate exams; (2) to examine whether cognitive dissonance theory, from the motive viewpoint, is applicable to attitude changes in participating in certificate examinations, while examining the relationship between the impact of external justifications on attitude changes (including rewards, free will, responsibility, commitment, and effort or cost) and student attitudes.
Utilizing the attribution approach of Schachter and Singer (1962), Zanna and Cooper (1974) hypothesized that if dissonance was an arousal state and attitude change reduced it, then attitude change should not be observed after the attribution of arousal to a plausible external source.
That attitude change came from first-year head coach Mike Babcock and first-year general manager Bryan Murray, who coached the Ducks last season.
Skinner said he sees an attitude change geared more toward team basketball.
It was basically an attitude change,'' Thousand Oaks coach Shea Johnson said of the difference between the win and Sunday's 22-6 loss to El Rio.
Orwig comes to play every day (she has 80 saves in her previous national tournaments) and has watched the Trojans attitude change of late.
Another Columbine student who played fantasy baseball with Klebold last year said he had noticed Klebold's appearance and attitude change over the past year.

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