attitude

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attitude

 [at´ĭ-to̳d]
1. a posture or position of the body; in obstetrics, the relation of the various parts of the fetal body to one another.
2. a pattern of mental views established by cumulative prior experience.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

at·ti·tude

(at'i-tūd),
1. Position of the body and limbs.
2. Manner of acting.
3. social or clinical psychology a relatively stable and enduring predisposition to behave or react in a certain way toward people, objects, institutions, or issues.
[Mediev. L. aptitudo, fr. L. aptus, fit]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

attitude

Anatomy
The position and relation of the body and body parts to each other, i.e., posture.

Psychology
A mental disposition or mindset. Attitude is a tendency, based on one’s beliefs and experience, to react to events in certain ways and approach or avoid events that confirm or challenge personal values.
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

attitude

Psychology “…the tendency towards a mode of response, toward the object in question.” See Abstract attitude.
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

at·ti·tude

(at'i-tūd)
1. Position of the body and limbs.
2. Manner of acting.
3. psychology A predisposition to behave or react in a certain way toward people, objects, institutions, or issues.
[Mediev. L. aptitudo, fr. L. aptus, fit]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

at·ti·tude

(at'i-tūd)
1. Position of the body and limbs.
2. Manner of behavior.
[Mediev. L. aptitudo, fr. L. aptus, fit]
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
In addition, the only classroom event to occur between the pre- and post-test was the viewing of a film in which an innocent man is executed, making it easier to pinpoint the event that triggered the attitude change. Thirdly, the instructor did not make herself known as a death penalty opponent, but simply told the students prior to viewing the film "mistakes do happen."
While attitude change research dates back to the early 20th century, the general concept has been historically attributed to ancient Greece and the writings of Aristotle (for a complete review see Petty & Wegener, 1998; Petty, Wegener, & Fabrigar, 1997).
In a second study on Fatal Vision goggles, we found that the attitude change on the BADDS was not sustained one month following the program.
That is, students who frequently accessed WebCT content pages showed a greater degree of attitude change than those who accessed such pages less frequently.
This article also examined the extent to which the Supreme Court rulings induced attitude change among young adults.
Attitudes and attitude change. In: Lindsey G, Aronson E, eds.
Ballet Long Island adds frogs in the "Waltz of the Flowers." Artistic director Debra Punzi explains, "When the frogs come out, you can hear the whole audience's attitude change. It definitely lightens it up." Ballet New England tosses in tipsy maids, National Ballet of Canada a dancing horse, and Colombia's Ballet Metropolitano de Medellin Coco the Clown.
The steps to accomplishing an attitude change are basically a strategy to alter an employee's opinion.
Barbara Mikulski (D-Md.) soon declared, "What we need to work on at the United States Naval Academy is an attitude change." Another committee member, Rep.
"Hopefully, there will be an attitude change at the board in the way it deals with people."
"In the second half, they knew they had to win the game and you could see their attitude change a bit."

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