attitude

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attitude

 [at´ĭ-to̳d]
1. a posture or position of the body; in obstetrics, the relation of the various parts of the fetal body to one another.
2. a pattern of mental views established by cumulative prior experience.

at·ti·tude

(at'i-tūd),
1. Position of the body and limbs.
2. Manner of acting.
3. social or clinical psychology a relatively stable and enduring predisposition to behave or react in a certain way toward people, objects, institutions, or issues.
[Mediev. L. aptitudo, fr. L. aptus, fit]

attitude

/at·ti·tude/ (at´ĭ-tldbomacd)
1. a position of the body; in obstetrics, the relation of the various parts of the fetal body.
2. a pattern of mental views established by cumulative prior experience.

attitude

[at′ətyo̅o̅d, -to̅o̅d]
Etymology: L, aptitude, fitness
1 a body position or posture, particularly the fetal position in the uterus, as determined by the degree of flexion of the head and extremities.
2 (in psychiatry) any of the major integrative forces in the development of personality that gives consistency to an individual's behavior. Attitudes are cognitive in nature, formed through interactions with the environment. They reflect the person's innermost convictions about situations good or bad, right or wrong, desirable or undesirable.

attitude

Anatomy
The position and relation of the body and body parts to each other, i.e., posture.

Psychology
A mental disposition or mindset. Attitude is a tendency, based on one’s beliefs and experience, to react to events in certain ways and approach or avoid events that confirm or challenge personal values.

attitude

Psychology “…the tendency towards a mode of response, toward the object in question.” See Abstract attitude.

at·ti·tude

(at'i-tūd)
1. Position of the body and limbs.
2. Manner of acting.
3. psychology A predisposition to behave or react in a certain way toward people, objects, institutions, or issues.
[Mediev. L. aptitudo, fr. L. aptus, fit]

attitude

a relatively enduring evaluative reaction to other individuals, situations or objects, which may be positive or negative. Typically defined as comprising affective cognitive and behavioural components.

at·ti·tude

(at'i-tūd)
1. Position of the body and limbs.
2. Manner of behavior.
[Mediev. L. aptitudo, fr. L. aptus, fit]

attitude

a posture or position of the body; in obstetrics, the relation of the various parts of the fetal body to one another. See also posture.
References in periodicals archive ?
It might also be that greater attitude change may occur if the postevaluation had been administered at a later date.
Important questions remain: Is the mandated use of instructional technology only related to positive attitude change if the usage is deemed central to the learning process?
In a second study on Fatal Vision goggles, we found that the attitude change on the BADDS was not sustained one month following the program.
Prevention and intervention targeting attitude change with adults charged with DWI also deserves examination.
If an initial study of the curriculum finds that Windmills positively impacts attitudes, future research could attempt to determine if this attitude change results in increased hiring of people with disabilities.
However, despite a lack of progress in curbing actual content piracy, there have been some significant attitude changes that may ultimately improve cooperation between the two industries.
When playing Alien Checkers, your opponent is a menacing, monstrous, otherworldly player with a bully's snarl and (on audio-capable systems) an audible growl; his attitude changes considerably when you beat him.
When playing Alien Checkers, your opponent is a menacing, monstrous, otherworldly player with a bully's snarl and (on audio capable systems) an audible growl; his attitude changes considerably when you beat him.
Until this attitude changes, the North East will continue to top leagues of shame, with the National Health struggling to keep up.
There is no compelling evidence to date that zoos and aquariums promote attitude changes, education, or interest in conservation in their visitors, despite claims to the contrary," states lead author Lori Marino, a neuroscientist at Emory University, Atlanta.
The survey highlights how, despite attitude changes towards global warming, pressure from legislation and cost benefits of going green, many businesses are struggling to develop sustainable business practices.

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