attachment

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attachment

 [ah-tach´ment]
1. the development of strong affectional ties between an infant and a significant other (mother, father, sibling, caretaker); this is a psychological, rather than a biological, process.
2. the initial stage of infection of a cell by a virus, in which the viral envelope finds a suitable receptor on the cell surface, enabling the virus to enter. Called also adsorption.
risk for impaired parent/infant/child attachment a nursing diagnosis accepted by the North American Nursing Diagnosis Association, defined as disruption of the interactive process between parent/significant other and infant that fosters the development of a protective and nurturing reciprocal relationship. Possible causes include inadequacy of the parent or parent substitute (such as anxiety or substance abuse), illness in the child, physical separation, lack of privacy, and others.

at·tach·ment

(ă-tach'ment),
1. A connection of one part with another.
2. In dentistry, a mechanical device for the fixation and stabilization of a dental prosthesis.
3. In psychiatry and psychology, a concept encompassing the strength and style of connectedness in primate relationships.

attachment

Informatics A file (e.g., in a .pdf, .jpg or other format) that is often sent with an email.
MedspeakUK A term of art for a specific post (job) within an educational programme.
Psychology A popular term for the emotional bond between people (e.g., infant with primary caregiver; parent with child; husband with wife) or any long-lasting bond that a person develops toward another person or object.

attachment

Psychiatry The behavior of an organism that relates in an affiliative or dependent manner to another object which develops during critical periods of life and can be extinguished by lack of opportunity to relate; if separation occurs before maturation can provide for adaptive adjustment, personality deviation can occur

at·tach·ment

(ă-tach'mĕnt)
1. A connection of one part with another.
2. dentistry A mechanical device for the fixation and stabilization of a dental prosthesis.

attachment

an enlargement of the base of an algal THALLUS by which the plant is anchored to the SUBSTRATE.

at·tach·ment

(ă-tach'mĕnt)
1. In dentistry, a mechanical device for the fixation and stabilization of a dental prosthesis.
2. A connection of one part with another.
References in periodicals archive ?
Avoidant attachment encompassed characteristics like sense of love-worthiness and negative disposition toward other people.
Therefore, when understanding the relationship between attachment styles and emotional regulation one can easily understand that as the child's behavior is prearranged to maintain proximity to the caregiver because of its helplessness and dependency that is why when this goal is not fulfilled, the child experiences anxiety.
However, the focus on bonding with God has not addressed whether parental marital status predicts variability in attachment to God.
The seminal work in attachment theory originated from observations of orphans during the Second World War (Bowlby, 1973, 1988).
Instead of equipment over-engineered for its main task and asked to awkwardly perform several others, each forklift and attachment should be tailored to well-defined needs.
THE TEACHER WILL COMPLETE the final review, checking for these criteria: (1) The minimum number of materials and attachments are included; (2) The object is stable (nothing falls off when shaken); and (3) The work shows artistic thinking.
Contraindications to the use of attachments in RPDs are numerous.
Romualdo said that this arrangement has led to pole owners charging excessive amounts for cable TV and telecommunications pole attachments. These huge costs are then passed on to their customers, he said.
Precision attachments have prefabricated, machined components with precisely manufactured metal-to-metal parts with close tolerances of 0.001.
Parental attachment is the view of one's level of emotional relationship with his or her parent and their chief caregiver (Sonkin, 2005).
Since Bowlby's (1969) original conception of attachment theory, others have examined different aspects like attachment stability (e.g., Fraley, 2002) and attachment across relationships (e.g., Sedikides & Brewer, 2001) including romantic relationships (e.g., Hazan & Shaver, 1987).
Various researches have been done in the area of attachment styles and marital satisfaction and have mostly shown that there are differences between attachment styles in terms of marital satisfaction level.