anetoderma

(redirected from Atrophia Maculosa Varioliformis Cutis)
Also found in: Wikipedia.

anetoderma

 [an″ĕ-to-der´mah]
localized elastolysis producing circumscribed areas of soft, thin, wrinkled skin that often protrude as small outpouchings. It may be a primary condition or it may be secondary to some other condition involving the skin, such as syphilis, leprosy, or tuberculosis.

an·e·to·der·ma

(an-ĕ-tō-der'mă),
Atrophoderma in which the skin becomes baglike and wrinkled or depressed, with loss of dermal elasticity.
[G. anetos, relaxed, + derma, skin]

anetoderma

/an·e·to·der·ma/ (an″ĕ-to-der´mah) localized elastolysis producing circumscribed areas of soft, thin, wrinkled skin that often protrude in small outpouchings.
perifollicular anetoderma  anetoderma occurring around hair follicles not preceded by folliculitis; it may be caused by elastase-producing staphylococci, by drugs, or by endocrine factors.
postinflammatory anetoderma  a condition occurring usually during infancy, marked by the development of erythematous papules that enlarge to form plaques, followed by laxity of the skin resembling cutis laxa.

anetoderma

[an′ətōdur′mə]
Etymology: Gk, anetos, relaxed, derma, skin
an idiopathic clinical change produced by focal damage to elastin fibers that results in looseness of the skin. There is no known effective treatment.
enlarge picture
Anetoderma

an·e·to·der·ma

(an'ĕ-tō-dĕr'mă)
Atrophoderma in which the skin becomes baglike and wrinkled.
[G. anetos, relaxed, + derma, skin]

anetoderma

looseness and atrophy of the skin.
References in periodicals archive ?
Clinical history, cutaneous and histopathological findings of our case fits in to the description of atrophia maculosa varioliformis cutis.
Atrophia maculosa varioliformis cutis, spontaneous varioliform scarring of cheek.
Atrophia maculosa varioliformis cutis was initially described in 1918 as an entity in which both linear and punctate scars appeared spontaneously on normal facial skin.
4 atrophia maculosa varioliformis cutis has autosomal dominant inheritance.
Treatment for atrophia maculosa varioliformis cutis has not been discussed in the literature.
This type of atrophia maculosa varioliformis cutis, which is more frequently referred to as anetoderma or drug-induced pseudoporphyria, can occur in patients taking other NSAIDs but the incidence appears to be highest in those taking naproxen.