atomism

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Related to Atomists: atomism, Sophists, Pythagoreans

at·om·ism

(at'ŏm-izm),
The approach to the study of a psychological phenomenon through analysis of the elementary parts of which it is assumed to be composed. Compare: holism.

atomism

A term of uncertain utility for the analysis of the individual components of psychological phenomena.
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References in periodicals archive ?
76) Morales (2004, 132-135) convincingly identifies the atomists as Achilles' most important source, against Goldhill (2001, 168-169, 177-179) who links them more closely with Stoic theory.
The Stoics, Epicureans and other Hellenistic Schools have roots in the insights of Heraclitus, the Atomists, and early Pluralists like Empedocles, and even owe something to Gorgias and Protagoras.
5) He seems unaware that, in its basic assumptions, this is actually a very old worldview, dating back at least to the Atomists and Epicurus in the fifth to the third centuries B.
Nearly a century separated Darwin from Watson and Crick; more than two centuries elapsed from the time of Galileo and Newton to Einstein; millennia passed from the Greek atomists to the atom's splitting.
As Cornford argues, it is the invention of geometers and atomists which eventually led to the counter-intuitive concept of infinite space:
He illustrates this claim by stating that even if the atomists were correct that the heavens were due to accidental causes (II 4, 196a25-b5), nonetheless there would be prior [TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII.
Al-Razi points out that this is the view of the philosophers, especially Aristotle and Ibn Sina, but that he will argue the case for the atomists.
We now move to Lubeck 1895 and an intense discussion between Wilhelm Oswald (1845-1915) and the atomists represented by Boltzmann and Felix Klein (1849-1925).
The roots of their philosophical arguments lay explicitly in the writings of the Greek atomists Democritus (mid-fifth to fourth century BCE) and Epicurus (342-72 BCE).
In order to better address the problem of Borges's famous Babelian library and how it is constituted, we must scale back and have recourse to the debates of antiquity between the finite Aristotelian universe and the infinite "all" (pan) of the Greek Atomists.
The more exciting claims of this book include that early sixteenth century medical authors such as Girolamo Fracastoro and Jean Fernel were influenced by Ficino's theory of seeds--which ultimately derived from Plotinus--and that Gassendi's usage of the concept of seed derived as much from seventeenth-century alchemical writers as it did from the ancient atomists.
If reporters were willing to take an even more historic--and I'd argue relevant--leap they could help people realize how today's issues compare with a similar debate that occurred in ancient Greece among philosophers, with the atomists (proto-evolutionists) facing off against the First Cause crowd (proto-design advocates).