atomism

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Related to Atomists: atomism, Sophists, Pythagoreans

at·om·ism

(at'ŏm-izm),
The approach to the study of a psychological phenomenon through analysis of the elementary parts of which it is assumed to be composed. Compare: holism.

atomism

A term of uncertain utility for the analysis of the individual components of psychological phenomena.
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Having put to rest arguments by historians, existentialists and atomists as futile in solving the question on purpose of life, let us now turn to biblical and African metaphysical theories of creation-theories which are the basis of the Shonas' view of purpose of life.
the theories of the atomists and Anaxagoras), and does the same in the fifth chapter for theories that only posit the existence of a single kind of element (e.
5) However, its findings render Gorlaeus (1591-1612) by no means a less mysterious figure, chiefly because it shows that this pioneering atomist was a theology student who died at age twenty-one.
One of the most telling arguments used against the claims of the ancient Greek atomists is almost identical to that leveled against materialist, reductive science, and naturalism today: if the world is only atoms and the void, then why tell the truth and why fight for Athens?
Not only did the new scientific and philosophical thinking reach back to the medieval time and Greek antiquity, to the technical experiments of the alchemists and astrologers or the speculations of the atomists and natural philosophers, but older ways of seeing the world persisted and became integrated into newer ones.
Daniel Sennert and Francis Bacon, for example, appear as atomists, but clearly neither are Epicurean atomists.
Conceptual atomists argue that most of our concepts are primitive.
These ancient atomists held quite bland visions of public life.
Some atomists balk at this overly austere, physically rarefied definition of the body, and so they suggest that the body must be composed of at least eight atoms, while others say that the body must at least have length, breadth and depth, as noted above.
An advantage of Aristotle's notion of nature compared to that of the ancient atomists is that on an Aristotelian conception of nature, something can have an extrinsic cause and still be natural.
Some of these are established classics in histories of human-animal relations; others, such as the ruminations of the atomists and the plays of Sophocles, are less known or else underappreciated.
The atomists are also opposed to other things well-known to engineers.