atomize

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atomize

(at′ŏm-īz″)
To convert a liquid to a spray or vapor.
atomization (at″ŏ-mĭ-zā′shŏn)
References in periodicals archive ?
The "Prologue" of Atomised is divided into two sections, the first announcing the book's subject matter (the story of the last "metaphysical mutation" and Michel Djerzinski's role in it), and the second taking the form of a poem presenting the eternal bliss of the post-apocalyptic, neo-human era.
379.) The conditionality of the "eternal bliss" (now conveyed by terms like happy, paradise and gods) points to the potential double bind of Houellebecq's apocalypse that we are going to examine in the following sections, where we will try to establish how the The possibility of an island draws on genres like apocalyptical and Utopian writing, as well as science fiction, in order to continue, but also to question the millennial project of Atomised.
This potential duplicity of an apocalyptic vision is clearly illustrated by Houellebecq's two novels: the "Prologue" of Atomised creates an aura of revelation and eternal joy, only to be somewhat undermined by the "Epilogue" (12) which hints at the subsequent dark version of disappointment and despair to follow in The possibility of an island, when the time after the apocalypse turns into a kind of dystopia.
Before proposing a reading of the latter text to prove the above hypothesis, it must be mentioned that neither Atomised nor The possibility of an island can be regarded as constitutive of full-blown utopias: the ideal world suggested in Atomised is never worked out in full socio-political detail which could serve as a recognisable alternative milieu with the critique of a current order normally implied in such a utopian construction.
In Atomised as well as in The possibility of an island, subjects like eternal youth and the uninterrupted continuation of corporeal existence through cloning, reveal humanity's underlying utopian wish.
The narrative structure of the body of the novel is more complex than that of Atomised: it is divided into two parts which are presented as the commentaries of two clones, Daniel 24 and Daniel 25, (15) on the life-story of their ancestor Daniel 1.
(23) Whilst Michel Djerzinski, whose research on cloning was worthy of respect, represented in Atomised the element of science in the symbolic field of science versus love, the Elohimites, rather satirically pictured, fulfil this role in The possibility of an island.
Houellebecq thus not only takes up the challenge set in Atomised when it is mentioned that the biologist Julian Huxley tried in a not altogether convincing manner "to set out the principles of a religion which could dovetail with science" (Houellebecq, 2001a:192), but also positions himself within the tradition set by Aldous Huxley's Brave new world.
(25) The second element of the Barthesian symbolic field, observed in Atomised, namely that of love, now gains in importance with the implied suggestion that science will not create a future world better than the present one, if there still is no possibility of love.
It is specifically the multigeneric aspect of The possibility of an island which allows for a second imaginative investigation after Atomised (26) into contemporary concerns and the consequences of scientific research on future generations.
(4) All the quotations from Atomised refer to the English translation (2001) of the original French text Les particules elementaires (1998).