turbulence

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tur·bu·lence

(tŭr'byū-lĕnts),
In cardiology, erratic motion.
[L. turbulentus, stirred up, fr. turbo, to disturb]

turbulence,

n casting term used to denote irregular flow of metal into a mold. May result in porosity.
References in periodicals archive ?
The resulting model of atmospheric turbulence predicts that using longer wavelengths would produce only marginal improvement in clarity.
To ensure that the sophisticated flight system was properly designed, Lockheed Martin developed the brassboard to simulate the flight hardware, as well as the disturbances -- such as aircraft jitter and atmospheric turbulence -- to which the hardware must respond.
On the way to the beam splitter one signal goes through a variable optical delay circuit intended to compensate both for the rotation of the earth during tracking and changes in atmospheric turbulence.
In contrast, because radio waves are not affected by atmospheric turbulence, interferometry is the most common observing technique in radioastronomy.
To ensure the sophisticated beam control flight system is properly designed, Lockheed Martin developed the laboratory demonstrator to simulate the flight hardware as well as the disturbances -- such as aircraft platform motion and atmospheric turbulence -- to which the hardware and software must respond and compensate.
The system, which can view and plot the trajectory of satellites and stars, is used to study atmospheric turbulence.
Due to atmospheric turbulence, the mixing of hot and cold air, capturing sharp images of distant objects is difficult.
However, the laws of physics say that a laser only can engage targets in front of an aircraft that is travelling close to the speed of sound unless atmospheric turbulence can be counteracted.
However, the laws of physics say that a laser only can engage targets in front of an aircraft that is traveling close to the speed of sound -- unless atmospheric turbulence can be counteracted.
For many practical applications, the fluctuations of the refractive index are relatively small: this applies both to the atmospheric turbulence, and to the water reservoirs of fluctuating temperature and salinity.
If you do this regularly, you'll start to notice how variable the quality of the night sky can be - based on weather conditions, atmospheric turbulence and the amount of light pollution affecting your skies.
Because atmospheric turbulence and inclement weather can significantly affect a free space optical system's performance at operationally useful ranges, numerous past FSO research and development programs have attempted to use complex technology to reduce the impact of turbulence and weather effects and improve performance.

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