atmosphere

(redirected from Atmospheres)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Legal, Idioms, Encyclopedia.
Related to Atmospheres: Planetary atmospheres

atmosphere

 [at´mos-fēr]
1. the entire gaseous envelope surrounding the earth and subject to the earth's gravitational field.
2. the air or climate in a particular place. adj., atmospher´ic.
3. a unit of pressure, being that exerted by the earth's atmosphere at sea level; equal to 1.01325 × 105pascals (approximately 760 mm Hg). Abbreviated atm.

at·mos·phere

(at'mŏs-fēr),
1. Any gas surrounding a given body; a gaseous medium.
See also: standard atmosphere, torr.
2. A unit of air pressure equal to 101.325 kPa.
See also: standard atmosphere, torr.
[atmo- + G. sphaira, sphere]

at·mos·phere

(at'mŏs-fēr)
1. Any gas surrounding a given body; a gaseous medium.
2. A unit of air pressure equal to 101.325 kPa.
See also: standard atmosphere
[atmo- + G. sphaira, sphere]

atmosphere

the gaseous envelope surrounding a particular body such as the earth, or the gaseous content of a given structure or container.

Atmosphere

A measurement of pressure. One atmosphere equals the pressure of air at sea level (14.7 pounds per square inch [psi]).
References in periodicals archive ?
The theme of atmospheres within philosophy, aesthetics, and critical theory has developed steadily over the last two decades.
The great Russian 18th-century scientist Mikhail Lomonosov has been widely credited with the discovery of Venus's atmosphere during the 1761 transit of Venus that he observed from St.
In the latest breakthrough for exoplanet science, a team using the European Southern Observatory's Very Large Telescope has obtained a crude spectrum for the upper atmosphere of a super-Earth orbiting a dim red dwarf star 40 light-years away in Ophiuchus.
It's still unclear when scientists will have the tools to characterize extrasolar planets' atmospheres with enough precision to recognize signs of life.
New laboratory experiments suggest that in the era just before the dinosaurs went extinct, extra carbon dioxide in the atmosphere may have done the trick, boosting plant productivity to at least three times that of today's ecosystems.
Mold Atmospheres: The more reducing mold atmospheres (those rich in |H.sub.2~ and having a higher CO/C|O.sub.2~ ratio) tend to promote pinholing.
Also, he notes, similar simulations should shed light on the cratering rates on other celestial objects with atmospheres, such as Venus, Mars, and Saturn's moon Titan.
The team reported their observations online April 11 in the Journal of Geophysical Research (Atmospheres).
In planetary atmospheres, in contrast, the smaller, denser volume of material makes the scattering of incoming solar X rays dominate over interactions with the solar wind, says Dennerl.
Astronomers have long wondered what the atmospheres of planets beyond the solar system might be like.
27 JOURNAL OF GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH (ATMOSPHERES) that a small but significant change in the way the atmosphere circulates in the tropics may explain the increased dustiness during glacial times.
That impact and its reverberations, which compressed the volatile element to nearly 2 million atmospheres of pressure and cooked it to 4,400 kelvins, lasted long enough for researchers to watch hydrogen's electrical resistivity drop to a value typical of metals such as cesium and rubidium at that temperature.

Full browser ?