atmosphere

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Related to Atmospheres: Planetary atmospheres

atmosphere

 [at´mos-fēr]
1. the entire gaseous envelope surrounding the earth and subject to the earth's gravitational field.
2. the air or climate in a particular place. adj., atmospher´ic.
3. a unit of pressure, being that exerted by the earth's atmosphere at sea level; equal to 1.01325 × 105pascals (approximately 760 mm Hg). Abbreviated atm.

at·mos·phere

(at'mŏs-fēr),
1. Any gas surrounding a given body; a gaseous medium.
See also: standard atmosphere, torr.
2. A unit of air pressure equal to 101.325 kPa.
See also: standard atmosphere, torr.
[atmo- + G. sphaira, sphere]

atmosphere

/at·mos·phere/ (at´mos-fēr)
1. the entire gaseous envelope surrounding the earth and subject to the earth's gravitational field.
2. the air or climate in a particular place.
3. a unit of pressure, being that exerted by the earth's atmosphere at sea level; equal to 1.01325 × 105pascals (approximately 760 mm Hg). Abbreviated atm.

atmosphere (atm)

[at′məsfir]
Etymology: Gk. atmos, vapor, sphaira, sphere
1 the natural body of air covers the surface of the earth. It is composed of approximately 20% oxygen, 78% nitrogen, and 1% argon and other gases, including small amounts of carbon dioxide hydrogen, and ozone as well as traces of helium, krypton, neon, and xenon and varying amounts of water vapor.
2 an envelope of gas, which may or may not duplicate the natural atmosphere in chemical components.
3 a unit of gas pressure that is usually defined as being equivalent to the average pressure of the earth's atmosphere at sea level, or about 14.7 pounds per square inch or 760 mm Hg. atmospheric, adj.

at·mos·phere

(at'mŏs-fēr)
1. Any gas surrounding a given body; a gaseous medium.
2. A unit of air pressure equal to 101.325 kPa.
See also: standard atmosphere
[atmo- + G. sphaira, sphere]

atmosphere

the gaseous envelope surrounding a particular body such as the earth, or the gaseous content of a given structure or container.

Atmosphere

A measurement of pressure. One atmosphere equals the pressure of air at sea level (14.7 pounds per square inch [psi]).
References in periodicals archive ?
Indeed, his project differs radically from Griffero's in seeking to burst the bubble of atmospheres, accenting its seductive propensity to draw us inwards.
The reducing atmosphere theory also is important to consider.
During that passage, or transit, some of the Crab's X rays were absorbed by Titan's atmosphere.
Sun-watching space observatories such as SOHO (Solar and Heliospheric Observatory) and TRACE (Transition Region and Coronal Explorer), which orbit above Earth's turbulent atmosphere, should have ringside seats for the transit.
Seacoal acts by expanding to fill the spaces between the sand grains, not by producing a reducing atmosphere in the mold.
New laboratory experiments suggest that in the era just before the dinosaurs went extinct, extra carbon dioxide in the atmosphere may have done the trick, boosting plant productivity to at least three times that of today's ecosystems.
Pitch and seacoal additions, however, produce reducing atmospheres and help alleviate pinholes, even though seacoal actually increases hydrogen pickup by the iron.
Although Earth and the moon inhabit the same cosmic neighborhood, our planet has far fewer scars from extraterrestrial impacts because incoming objects burn up in its atmosphere.
X rays from the sun induce the emissions when they interact with atoms in Mars' upper atmosphere.

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