athletic training

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athletic training

The practice of physical conditioning and reconditioning of athletes and prevention of injuries incurred by them.
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

athletic training

Sports medicine The practice of physical conditioning and reconditioning of athletes and prevention of injuries incurred by athletes. See Athlete, Athletic trainer.
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

ath·le·tic train·ing

(ath-let'ik trān'ing)
Provision of comprehensive health care services to athletes, including preventive preparation, evaluation of illnesses and injuries, first aid and emergency care, rehabilitation, and other related services.
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

athletic training

1. The physical and mental conditioning program used by athletes to increase their proficiency in sports.
2. Performing the tasks that an athletic trainer is prepared to do. Athletic training is practiced by athletic trainers, health care professionals who collaborate with physicians to optimize activity and participation of patients and clients. Athletic training encompasses the prevention, diagnosis, and intervention of emergency, acute, and chronic medical conditions involving impairment, functional limitations, and disabilities.
See: athletic trainer
See also: training
Medical Dictionary, © 2009 Farlex and Partners
References in periodicals archive ?
* Player is removed from field of play by athletic therapist or player is unable to return to play.
Injury Reports are submitted at the end of the session by the athletic therapists to the clinic supervisor who ensures that a clinic employee enters them into the clinic database.
In this specific study inter-examiner variability exists between the various athletic therapists. Although they are trained to follow protocol, their interpretation of the injuries can affect reported findings.
The team's head athletic therapist recorded all injuries that occurred while playing in a hockey game or practice including the diagnosis, number of man games lost for each injury and whether the injury was from contact or non-contact.
* Head athletic therapist for the York University male varsity hockey team (2002-2003)
* Head athletic therapist for York University male varsity baseball team (2001-2002)
(13) conducted a survey questionnaire of Canadian sports medicine physicians, physiotherapists, athletic therapists, chiropractors, massage therapists, athletes, coaches and representatives from 3 organizations to determine which profession is best perceived to evaluate an athlete's RTP.
Members of the CCSS(C), along with sports Medical Doctors, sports Physiotherapists, Athletic Therapists and Sports Massage Therapists make up the Service Provider Expert Group which advises the COC on health care policy development and provider selection for various International Games.