ARIC

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ARIC

Atherosclerosis Risk In Communities study. A study evaluating risk factors associated with atherosclerosis.
Conclusion LDL, triglycerides, apolipoprotein B, and lipoprotein A were higher; HDL, apolipoprotein A-I were lower in subjects who developed coronary disease; premature ventricular contractions were present in >6% and associated with hypertension, heart disease, faster sinus rates, electrolyte abnormalities. Anaemia was an independent risk factor for adverse cardiovascular disease outcomes.
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References in periodicals archive ?
The Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities Study correlated preexisting high anti-CMV titers and traditional risk factors with carotid atherosclerosis, incident MI or CHD death (relative risk 1.76; 95% confidence interval 1.00-3.11) during a 5-year follow-up period (57).
For example, the prospective, nested Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities Study found no association between incident CHD and preexisting HSV-1 antibodies (57).
COLORADO SPARINGS -- Former non-drinkers who initiated moderate alcohol consumption in middle age experienced a 38% reduction in cardiovascular events over 4 years, compared with continued nondrinkers, in the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities study.
The contextual effect of the local food environment on residents' diets: the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities Study. Am J Public Health 92:1761-1788.
The third study, the United States Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities study (7), reported a C282Y carrier frequency of 9.9% among 243 CHD cases and 6.1% among 535 selected noncases.
The Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities study, reported in the February 25, 2012 issue of the European Journal of Heart Failure, found that low FEV (1) (a lung test which measures the amount of air an individual can exhale in one second) and an obstructive respiratory disease (such as COPD or emphysema, but not asthma) are associated with heart failure.
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