asylum

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a·sy·lum

(ă-sī'lŭm),
Older term for an institution for the housing and care of those who by reason of age or of mental or bodily infirmities are unable to care for themselves.
[L. fr. G. asylon, a sanctuary, fr. a- priv. + sylē, right of seizure]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

asylum

Global village
Protection given by a state (country) to a foreign person fleeing persecution in his or her own country. Asylum is given under the 1951 United Nations Convention Relating to the Status of Refugees; to be recognised as a refugee, one must have left his or country and be unable to go back because he or she has a well-founded fear of persecution.

Medical history
An obsolete term for a healthcare facility for patients who are unable to care for themselves; e.g., institution. The choice of appropriate equivalent term for asylum is based on the nature of the underlying condition: for example, if the condition is mental, it may be designated as a psychiatric inpatient facility; if the institutionalisation is for a terminal physical condition (e.g., AIDS or cancer) it is termed hospice.
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

a·sy·lum

(ă-sī'lŭm)
Facility dedicated for the relief of care of the destitute or sick, especially those with mental illness.
[L. fr. G. asylon, a sanctuary, fr. a- priv. + sylē, right of seizure]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

asylum

A once compassionate but now pejorative term for a psychiatric hospital or an institution for the care of the elderly and infirm.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
A second problem is that Finnegan places the Good Shepherd Sisters at the center of the magdalen movement in Ireland, and she insists that the Good Shepherd asylums were representative of the magdalen system as a whole.
Rendering a nuanced portrait of asylum residents "at work and recreation together" (81), Cohen depicts marginal women as neither heroic nor helpless, but rather as sometimes simple, sometimes savvy individuals whose dreams, abilities, and fates differed as much as did the women themselves.
Doctors described first-class patients as suffering from "temporary weakness" or affected intellect, while they characterized workers as "perfect Idiots" and "maniacs." As most patients belonged to the latter group, asylums operated as last resorts for soldiers and poor whites who did not respond to social discrimination or military discipline.
Instead, what really hooks Goldberg is the idea of using this kind of asylum evidence to get the goods on "capitalism" and the efforts of the "bourgeoisie" to have psychiatrists (as the agents of capitalism) pull the lower orders into line by pathologizing their behavior, "The emergence of the asylum worked to turn the depressed, disturbed, lazy, superstitious, and sexually deviant into medical cases that were diagnosed accordingly." (184) All of this is pure Michel Foucault, with a sort of feminist spin.
The ideology of English asylum reform, insists Scull, disguised an awkward and embarrassing reality.
In Germany - which took in a total of 154,485 asylum seekers - the ratio was one for every 534 of its existing population, while in Sweden it was one for every 657 and in Norway one for every 1,321.
Finally, the Rudd government argues that a tougher asylum policy is needed in order to deter asylum seekers arriving in Australia with illegitimate claims.
The hurdles facing these asylum seekers are truly daunting.
By the 1840s, however, an informal campaign for "idiocy reform" had begun, leading to the founding of the Earlswood Asylum. Yet, as Wright so ably demonstrates, the decision to resort to institutional care was complex.
While the asylum was not created to control African Americans, (they were not admitted there until the end of the nineteenth century), conditions were consistently worse for them than for whites once they became patients, according to the author.
The real tragedy for the mentally ill and the essence of the failure of the move from asylum to community has been the separation of care and treatment.
In a graphic and absorbing way, Asylum brings to the viewer the essence of Americans' unresolved attitudes about the mentally ill.