refugee

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Related to Asylum-seeker: Political refugees

refugee

A person who:
(1) has a well-founded fear of persecution for reasons of race, religion, nationality, political opinion or membership of a particular social group;
(2) is outside the country he or she belongs to or normally resides in; and
(3) is unable or unwilling to return home for fear of persecution.

Refugees may include those fleeing from war or civil disturbance of any kind; a permutation is that of an ‘internally displaced’ person who moves within the borders of one country for the same reasons. The mortality rate of refugees is 60-fold greater than that of a similar non-displaced population; it is highest in children and is due to measles, diarrhoea-related illnesses, acute upper RTIs, malaria and is in part related to the virtually endemic protein-energy malnutrition and micronutrient deficiencies that characterise the refugee state; diarrhoea is the most common cause of death (36,000 children die/day of diarrhoea).

Refugees have been called the fourth world, and have included Afghans, Armenians, Bengalis, Biafrans, Bosnians, Cambodians, Chileans, Croats, Cubans, Czechoslovakians, Ethiopians, Hungarians, Iraqis, Laotians, Liberians, Palestinians, Russians, Rwandans, Serbs, Somalis, Vietnamese, and cross religious lines—Jews, Hindis, and Muslims Records.

In the UK, refugees are entitled to benefits.

refugee

A person fleeing danger or distress, esp. in times of war or political persecution.
References in periodicals archive ?
However, starting last year this has begun to change a bit, presumably because of Australia's relaunched Pacific Solution, which rules that no unauthorized maritime asylum-seeker will ever be resettled into Australia.
A typical route for asylum-seekers is, for example, to take a boat from Malaysia and cross over to the Riau Archipelago (close to Singapore) or to the Island of Sumatra, which can be done in a night.
But the nationwide poll, which quizzed 1,000 people also reveals a wind of change in Ireland's attitude towards asylum-seekers.
improving links with social services to make it easier to register asylum-seekers.
Council leaders said they were satisfied the Government was doing all it could to help reduce pressures following ugly clashes between asylum-seekers and residents at the weekend.
Asylum-seekers are usually put up in accommodation around Britain while they wait for the government's decision on whether or not they will be allowed to stay as refugees.
Thirdly, contrary to popular belief, asylum-seekers are unable to claim benefits such as working tax credit or child benefit, and receive only NASS allowance equivalent to around pounds 35 a week.
A spokesman for Cardiff council said the costs were entirely met by the Home Office, which disperses asylum-seekers throughout the country while their applications are processed.
Emma Tinkler, "Hunger Strike Ends at Camp," Montreal Gazette, 30 January 2002; Lindsey Arkley, "Afghan Asylum-seekers End Hunger Strike," USA Today, 31 January 2002; Patrick Barkham, "Refugees Dig Their Own Graves in Australian Detention," Guardian (London), 8 March 2002.
The detention of asylum-seekers who come 'directly' in an irregular manner should, therefore, not be automatic nor should it be unduly prolonged.
Bernd Sattler, a member of AK Asyl, a group that works with asylum-seekers told (http://www.