Astrovirus


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As·tro·vi·rus

(as'trō-vī'rŭs),
A small RNA virus and the only genus in the family Astroviridae; associated with diarrhea and detected in the feces of numerous animals.

Astrovirus

/As·tro·vi·rus/ (as´tro-vi″rus) an unofficial name for a group of RNA viruses with a single-stranded genome about the same size as that of the picornaviruses; they cause gastroenteritis in humans and other animals and hepatitis in ducklings.

astrovirus

/as·tro·vi·rus/ (as´tro-vi″rus) any virus belonging to the group Astrovirus.

As·tro·vi·rus

(as'trō-vī'rŭs)
A small RNA virus and the only genus in the family Astroviridae; it is associated with diarrhea and is detected in the feces of numerous animals.

astrovirus

A virus that causes diarrhoea in children and may be present in large numbers in the stools of adults without causing ill effects. Most adults have antibodies to the virus.

Astrovirus

a genus in the family Astroviridae; small, nonenveloped, single-stranded RNA virus associated with enteric infections in several species including cattle, sheep and dogs. In negatively stained electron micrographs virions have a characterisitic starlike staining pattern that gives the name to the genus.
References in periodicals archive ?
Astrovirus infections with central nervous system (CNS) involvement were reported recently in mink, human, bovine, ovine, and swine hosts (the latter in certain cases of AII type congenital tremors) (5,6,12-14).
In order to evaluate the specificity of the method, RNA isolated from rotavirus (RV) and astrovirus (AsTV) samples were included.
Molecular epidemiology of enteric viruses and genotyping of rotavirus A, adenovirus and astrovirus among children under 5 years old in Gabon.
Biofire GI Panel--can simultaneously detect Campylobacter jejuni, Campylobacter coli, Campylobacter upsaliensis, toxin producing Clostridium difficile, Plesiomonas shigelloides, Salmonella species, Yersinia enterocolitica, Vibrio parahaemolyticus, Vibrio vulnificus, Vibrio cholera, a variety of pathogenic Shigella and Escherichia species, Adenovirus, Astrovirus, Norovirus, Rotavirus, Sapovirus, Cryptosporidium species, and Cyclospora cayetanensis.
The presence of viral pathogens including rotavirus (Groups A, B, and C), norovirus (GI and GII), sapovirus, astrovirus, and adenovirus were detected by molecular biological techniques.
The gastrointestinal viruses were norovirus genogroup G1 and G2, astrovirus, and rotavirus.
The GI FilmArray detected a range of pathogens in the remaining 11 patients, including five cases of norovirus, four cases of rotavirus, two cases of Astrovirus, two cases of Sapovirus, and one case of enteroaggregative Escherichia coli.
Within these, the Group A of Rotavirus (RV) has been recognized as the most prevalent, but other viruses such as astrovirus, enteric adenovirus and norovirus (NV), have also been reported (Wilhelmi et al.
Rotavirus, adenovirus, astrovirus, calicivirus and small round virus particles in feces of children with and without acute diarrhea, from 1987 to 1988, in the greater Sao Paulo.
Viral pathogens isolated from the feces of patients with gastrointestinal infections are mostly RNA viruses including rotavirus, enteroviruses, astrovirus, calicivirus, hepatatis E virus, coronavirus and torovirus, and certain serotypes of the enteric adenovirus (Zhang et al.