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aster

 [as´ter]
a structure occurring in dividing cells, composed of microtubules radiating from a centrosome. The two asters are the poles of the spindle apparatus.
 Asters separating in prophase of mitosis. From Dorland's, 2000.

as·tro·sphere

(as'trō-sfēr),
A set of radiating microtubules extending outward from the cytocentrum and centrosphere of a dividing cell.
[G. astron, star, + sphaira, ball]

aster

/as·ter/ (as´ter) [L.] a system of microtubules arranged in starlike rays around each pair of centrioles during mitosis.
Enlarge picture
Asters separating in prophase of mitosis.

aster

(ăs′tər)
n.
Biology A star-shaped structure formed in the cytoplasm of an animal cell during mitosis, having raylike microtubules that surround the centrosome.

as·tro·sphere

(as'trō-sfēr)
A set of radiating microtubules extending outward from the cytocentrum and centrosphere of a dividing cell.
Synonym(s): aster, attraction sphere.
[G. astron, star, + sphaira, ball]
Asterclick for a larger image
Fig. 54 Aster . Generalized form.

aster

a group of blind-ending SPINDLE MICROTUBULES radiating out from the CENTRIOLES of dividing cells in lower plants and all animals. The aster function is uncertain, but does not seem to be concerned with spindle formation.

Aster

genus of selenium indicator plants in the family Asteraceae; preferentially accumulates selenium from the soil. Includes A. adscendens, A. coerulescens, A. commutatus, A. ericoides, A. glaucoides, A. laevis var. geyeri. See also xylorrhiza.

aster

a structure occurring in dividing cells, composed of microtubules radiating from a centrosome. The two asters are the poles of the mitotic spindle.
References in periodicals archive ?
Unlike New York asters, which are a promiscuous lot, often interbreeding with other species, New England asters keep themselves to themselves.
Asters should also be sprayed at the same time as roses because powdery mildews are found on the plant surface and are easily targeted.
Michaelmas Daisies belong to the aster family and are valuable for extending colour in the herbaceous border into September and October.
Most of our asters have a central disk of florets that maximize cross-pollination.
The name aster comes from the Greek word for star, so we've got a star offer for you.
Like most asters, 'Cape God' and 'Little Car low' are easy to grow.
We then tested the influence of nectar in attracting pollinators to the asters.
Asters can be planted in summer to fill gaps left by early-flowering perennials, and look great in silver, grey or pastel schemes.
Asters are ideal late summer blooms, especially as the temperate September weather is still encouraging people to make the most of their patios.