asterion

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asterion

 [as-te´re-on]
the point on the surface of the skull where the lambdoid, parietomastoid, and occipitomastoid sutures meet.
Asterion. From Dorland's, 2000.

as·te·ri·on

(ăs-tē'rē-on), [TA]
A craniometric point in the region of the posterolateral (mastoid) fontanelle, at the junction of the lambdoid, occipitomastoid, and parietomastoid sutures.
[G. asterios, starry]

asterion

/as·te·ri·on/ (as-tēr´e-on) pl. aste´ria   [Gr.] the point on the skull at the junction of occipital, parietal, and temporal bones.
Enlarge picture
Asterion.

as·te·ri·on

(as-tē'rē-on) [TA]
A craniometric point at the junction of the lambdoid, occipitomastoid, and parietomastoid sutures.
[G. asterios, starry]

asterion,

n point on the skull where the lambdoid, occipitotemporal, and parietotemporal sutures meet.

as·te·ri·on

(as-tē'rē-on) [TA]
Craniometric point in region of posterolateral (mastoid) fontanelle, at junction of lambdoid, occipitomastoid, and parietomastoid sutures.
[G. asterios, starry]
References in periodicals archive ?
Asterius calls the place itself a "common hearth and nourishment.
Asterius tagged this competition to win [TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII] among the wealthy notables as a madness and chief hindrance to the accomplishment of charitable works.
Emperors and the aristocracy spent lavishly on the sorts of people and entertainment that Asterius and other Christian leaders found abhorrent: dancers, jugglers, actors, buffoons, gladiators of various skills (Against Kalends, 4.
Polemic surfaces in the martyrial homilies at points where Asterius becomes dismayed that Christian ideals and holy days are not promoting unity, even among Christians.
Consequently the individual's politeia impacts that of the community, and for Asterius there was no better place to engage in an individual's formation than through the church, especially through the martyrs.
The focus on reforming the elite suggests that Asterius was applying his view of achieving an ideal polity in a Christian context.
There are sixteen extant homilies: Asterius of Amasea.
This passage illustrates how Asterius mixes philosophical traditions.
Asterius recounts that Julitta did not deny the accusation that she was a Christian and walked of her own accord into the flames prepared for her.
The picture that Asterius saw included details of Euphemia's torture before she was consigned to the flames.
Asterius borrowed part of Gregory of Nyssa's prayer to Theodore in order to illustrate a model prayer offered to a martyr by parents on behalf of their sick child.