asterion

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asterion

 [as-te´re-on]
the point on the surface of the skull where the lambdoid, parietomastoid, and occipitomastoid sutures meet.
Asterion. From Dorland's, 2000.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

as·te·ri·on

(ăs-tē'rē-on), [TA]
A craniometric point in the region of the posterolateral (mastoid) fontanelle, at the junction of the lambdoid, occipitomastoid, and parietomastoid sutures.
[G. asterios, starry]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

as·te·ri·on

(as-tē'rē-on) [TA]
A craniometric point at the junction of the lambdoid, occipitomastoid, and parietomastoid sutures.
[G. asterios, starry]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

as·te·ri·on

(as-tē'rē-on) [TA]
Craniometric point in region of posterolateral (mastoid) fontanelle, at junction of lambdoid, occipitomastoid, and parietomastoid sutures.
[G. asterios, starry]
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
More precisely, Vinzent argues that CAIV was written as an answer to Eusebius' Contra Marcellum and De ecclesiastica theologia, to the Marcellus attacked in them, to the Asterius refuted by Marcellus in them, and in addition directed against the theology, and particularly Christology, of Photinus of Sirmium.
Intersexual comparison of mimetic protection in the black swallowtail butterfly, Papilio polyxenes asterius Stoll.
By focusing first upon Asterius's critique of the festival of Kalends, I will outline how Asterius perceived the failure of Hellenistic religion and society.
The largest section (fragments 1-114 in Seibt's numeration) involves polemic against Asterius, the rest (fragments 115-28) final Parthian shots directed at those bishops (Eusebius of Caesarea, Narcissus of Neronias, and Paulinus of Tyre) who supported Asterius and the Arian theology.
Scholars have pointed out the extraordinary diffusion of the Improperia compositions in Syriac, Greek, and Latin liturgical usage; in patristic writers such as Aphrahat, Ephrem of Nineveh, Jacob of Serugh, Melito of Sardis, Cyril of Jerusalem, Asterius Sophistes, Romanos the Melodist, Pseudo-Cyprian (the author of Adversus Iudaeos); in the sermon "On the Soul and the Body" ascribed to Alexander of Alexandria and preserved only in Coptic; in New Testament Apocrypha such as the Acts of Pilate, the Acts of Thomas, and the Gospel of Bartholomew.
(154) In another writing, entitled De sancta ecclesia (especially [subsection] 8-16), Marcellus again introduces Hermes Trismegistus, along with Valentinus, Plato, and Aristotle, as the main "pagan" source for the doctrine of two gods preached by the "Ariomaniacs" Asterius the Sophist and Eusebius of Caesarea.
Asterius the Sophist is here given full credit as a theologian.
In the process of rehabilitating the reputed heretic, Lienhard examines Marcellus s theology as found in his primary work, the Contra Asterium, and then as found in the writings of his contemporary opponents (Eusebius of Caesarea, Eusebius of Nicomedia, Paulinus of Tyre, Narcissus of Neronias and Asterius the Sophist).
5: 1 in the homilies edited by Richard in 1956 and ascribed by him to the Arian Asterius the Sophist.
I have studied those passages in early Christian literature where, in theological discourse, [delta][iota][alpha][delta][eta][kappa][eta] is understood to mean `last Will and Testament' in my book Erbin Kirche: Die Auslegung von Psalm 5,1 in den Psalmenhomilien des Asterius und in der Alten Kirche, Heidelberg 1990 (AHAW.PH 1990/2), pp.
It includes quotations, or alleged quotations, from the writings of Arius and of his colleague Asterius. But these are interspersed with hostile comments, and we also hear of remarks thrown off in conversation by unnamed Arian partisans.