euthanasia

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Related to Assisted dying: euthanasia, Dignitas

euthanasia

 [u″thah-na´zhah]
1. an easy or painless death.
2. the deliberate ending of life of a person suffering from an incurable disease. In recent years the concept has been broadened to include the practice of withholding extraordinary means or “heroic measures,” and thus allowing the patient to die (see extraordinary treatment). A distinction was traditionally made between positive or active euthanasia, in which there is the deliberate ending of life and an action is taken to cause death in a person, and negative or passive euthanasia, which is the withholding of life-preserving procedures and treatments that would prolong the life of one who is incurably and terminally ill and could not survive without them. However, now all euthanasia is generally understood to be active, and so the more accurate term forgoing life-sustaining treatment is replacing passive euthanasia. See also advance directives.
voluntary euthanasia see assisted suicide.

eu·tha·na·si·a

(yū-thă-nā'zē-ă),
1. A quiet, painless death.
2. The intentional putting to death of a person with an incurable or painful disease intended as an act of mercy.
[eu- + G. thanatos, death]

euthanasia

(yo͞o′thə-nā′zhə, -zhē-ə)
n.
The act or practice of ending the life of a person or animal having a terminal illness or a medical condition that causes suffering perceived as incompatible with an acceptable quality of life, as by lethal injection or the suspension of certain medical treatments.
The induction of death, or painlessly putting to death a patient suffering from an incurable disease; deliberate administration of medications—e.g., narcotics or barbiturates—to a terminally ill patient at his/her own request, to end life

euthanasia

Medical ethics The induction of death, or painlessly putting to death, a Pt suffering from an incurable disease; deliberate administration of medications–eg narcotics or barbiturates to an terminally ill Pt at the Pt's own request, to end his/her life. See Advance directive, DNR, Initiative 119, Kevorkian, Physician-assisted suicide, Slow code, Social euthanasia.

eu·tha·na·si·a

(yū'thă-nā'zē-ă)
1. The intentional putting to death of a person with an incurable or painful disease, intended as an act of mercy.
2. A quiet, painless death.
Synonym(s): man-made death (1) .
[eu- + G. thanatos, death]

euthanasia

Mercy killing.

euthanasia

the act of painless killing to relieve human suffering from an incurable disease.

Euthanasia

The act of putting a person or animal to death painlessly or allowing them to die by withholding medical services, usually because of a painful and incurable disease. Mercy killing is another term for euthanasia.
Mentioned in: Bereavement, Suicide

eu·tha·na·si·a

(yū'thă-nā'zē-ă)
1. A quiet, painless death.
2. The intentional putting to death of a person with an incurable or painful disease intended as an act of mercy.
[eu- + G. thanatos, death]
References in periodicals archive ?
Quotes attributable to Voluntary Assisted Dying Board Chairperson Betty King
"Instead, my wife and girls face watching me starve, choke or suffocate to death, because of our inhumane and outdated laws that criminalise assisted dying."
"New polling shows the public support a change in the law, and I will continue to make the case for assisted dying to be legalised.
The award-winning documentary takes a fly-on-the wall style approach to several cases in the US state where assisted dying has been legal for the past 20 years.
When you try to impose your will to take away the assisted dying option from terminally ill patients, I am wondering whether your approach is any better than that of terrorists who try to impose their will upon others who do not agree with them.
Laws on euthanasia and assisted dying vary a deal in countries all over the world.
One of Dignity in Dying's supporters said that the cost "discriminates between the rich and poor" - and it hopes the findings will put pressure on the Government to make assisted dying legal here.
At our Annual Conference on 20 July 2017, the membership of the NSWNMA re-endorsed our Position Statement on Assisted Dying, which advocates for legislative change to support Voluntary Assisted Dying in circumstances where a dying person does not wish to suffer an unnecessarily agonising death.
Any limitations created by Canada's ban on medically assisted dying, the court determined, were consistent with the charter.
The Californian legislation was approved on September 11 2015, the same day that an Assisted Dying Bill was defeated in the House of Commons in the UK.

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