euthanasia

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Related to Assisted dying: euthanasia, Dignitas

euthanasia

 [u″thah-na´zhah]
1. an easy or painless death.
2. the deliberate ending of life of a person suffering from an incurable disease. In recent years the concept has been broadened to include the practice of withholding extraordinary means or “heroic measures,” and thus allowing the patient to die (see extraordinary treatment). A distinction was traditionally made between positive or active euthanasia, in which there is the deliberate ending of life and an action is taken to cause death in a person, and negative or passive euthanasia, which is the withholding of life-preserving procedures and treatments that would prolong the life of one who is incurably and terminally ill and could not survive without them. However, now all euthanasia is generally understood to be active, and so the more accurate term forgoing life-sustaining treatment is replacing passive euthanasia. See also advance directives.
voluntary euthanasia see assisted suicide.

eu·tha·na·si·a

(yū-thă-nā'zē-ă),
1. A quiet, painless death.
2. The intentional putting to death of a person with an incurable or painful disease intended as an act of mercy.
[eu- + G. thanatos, death]

euthanasia

/eu·tha·na·sia/ (u″thah-na´zhah)
1. an easy or painless death.
2. mercy killing; the deliberate ending of life of a person suffering from an incurable disease.

euthanasia

(yo͞o′thə-nā′zhə, -zhē-ə)
n.
The act or practice of ending the life of a person or animal having a terminal illness or a medical condition that causes suffering perceived as incompatible with an acceptable quality of life, as by lethal injection or the suspension of certain medical treatments.

euthanasia

[yo̅o̅′thənā′zhə]
Etymology: Gk, eu, good; thanatos, death
1 also called mercy killing. the deliberate causing of the death of a person who is suffering from an incurable disease or condition. It may be active, such as by administration of a lethal drug, or passive, such as by withholding of treatment. Legal authorities, church leaders, philosophers, and commentators on ethics and morality usually distinguish passive euthanasia from active euthanasia.
2 an easy, quiet, painless death.
The induction of death, or painlessly putting to death a patient suffering from an incurable disease; deliberate administration of medications—e.g., narcotics or barbiturates—to a terminally ill patient at his/her own request, to end life

euthanasia

Medical ethics The induction of death, or painlessly putting to death, a Pt suffering from an incurable disease; deliberate administration of medications–eg narcotics or barbiturates to an terminally ill Pt at the Pt's own request, to end his/her life. See Advance directive, DNR, Initiative 119, Kevorkian, Physician-assisted suicide, Slow code, Social euthanasia.

eu·tha·na·si·a

(yū'thă-nā'zē-ă)
1. The intentional putting to death of a person with an incurable or painful disease, intended as an act of mercy.
2. A quiet, painless death.
Synonym(s): man-made death (1) .
[eu- + G. thanatos, death]

euthanasia

Mercy killing.

euthanasia

the act of painless killing to relieve human suffering from an incurable disease.

Euthanasia

The act of putting a person or animal to death painlessly or allowing them to die by withholding medical services, usually because of a painful and incurable disease. Mercy killing is another term for euthanasia.
Mentioned in: Bereavement, Suicide

euthanasia (yōō·th·nāˑ·zh),

n the act of facilitating death in a terminally ill patient, whether by deliberate activity, such as the administration of drugs that hasten death (known as
active euthanasia), or passive, as in the withholding of life-extending treatment
(passive euthanasia).

eu·tha·na·si·a

(yū'thă-nā'zē-ă)
1. A quiet, painless death.
2. The intentional putting to death of a person with an incurable or painful disease intended as an act of mercy.
[eu- + G. thanatos, death]

euthanasia

(ū´thənā´zhə),
n an act of deliberately bringing about the death of a person who is suffering from an incurable disease or condition; also called
mercy killing. Active euthanasia is illegal in most jurisdictions; passive euthanasia, or the withholding of some life support systems, has legal standing in some jurisdictions.

euthanasia

1. an easy or painless death.
2. the deliberate ending of life of an animal suffering from an incurable disease; called also mercy killing, to put down, to put to sleep.
For the individual animal intravenous injection of a massive dose of barbiturate is best. Any narcotizing drug creates difficulties if the carcass is to be disposed of for pet meat. In those cases shooting with a bullet or captive bolt pistol is recommended because of the speed of the despatch. For large numbers of animals at a pound or shelter, injection procedures are still superior to the bulk methods which all have the fallibility of poorly managed and supervised machinery. Carbon monoxide is very fast but dangerous to the operators of the cabinet. Electrocution cannot be performed en masse and gassing with carbon monoxide or lowering of the atmospheric pressure are not really quick enough. Small laboratory animals are still despatched by a sharp blow to the head and birds by guillotine or separation of the cervical vertebrae.

electrical euthanasia
uses mains electrical current passed through the subject's body via clips applied to the skin of the ear and the tail. Not much employed because of danger to human operators, likelihood of equipment failure and need for close contact with device.
References in periodicals archive ?
When you try to impose your will to take away the assisted dying option from terminally ill patients, I am wondering whether your approach is any better than that of terrorists who try to impose their will upon others who do not agree with them.
Clinical students were more inclined to opt for assisted dying if they were ever terminally ill themselves (54.
In Belgium, on the other hand, both euthanasia and assisted dying is deemed legal.
Previous Dignity in Dying polls have shown 82 per cent of the public support the choice for assisted dying, while more than one in two GPs are supportive or neutral of it.
Justices McLachlin and L'Heureux-Dube believed that Rodriguez's Charter rights were violated by the Criminal Code prohibitions on assisted dying.
It shouldn't be beyond Members of Parliament and Members of the House of Lords to come up with a law that protects the elderly and vulnerable from assisted dying, but gives people like Lord Rix the opportunity to die with dignity.
Last September, MPs voted to defeat an assisted dying bill in the UK, despite 82% of the British public supporting such a law.
And what's going on in our three communities and right across this country is totally outright assisted dying by the government authorities right cross this country.
Although the Supreme Court of Canada has extended until June the deadline for Parliament to come up with a new law on assisted dying and provided some leeway for those seeking an assisted death in the interim, it put in place a number of legal hoops, hoops that are not easy for a sick old man with little money to jump through.
In 2013, the Royal College of General Practitioners (RCGP) consulted its members on assisted dying.
Hall Green Labour MP Roger Godsiff MP spoke after voting in favour of further consideration of the Assisted Dying Bill.
WESTMINSTER has rejected proposals to introduce assisted dying with two North Wales MPs speaking against the change in the law.