assassin bug

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as·sas·sin bug

an insect of the family Reduviidae (order Hemiptera) that inflicts irritating, painful bites in animals and humans; related to the cone-nosed bugs (triatomines), a vector of American trypanosomiasis.
[Fr., fr. It. assassino, fr. Ar. hashshāshin, those addicted to hashish]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

assassin bug

n.
Any of various predatory insects of the family Reduviidae, having a short stout beak used to prey on other insects or, in certain genera, to suck blood from mammals. Also called reduviid.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.
Any of the cone-nosed arthropods of the hemipteran family Reduviidae, order Hymenoptera, which includes true bugs, the trivial name refers to their insect predatory activity; those of the subfamily Triamtominae are vectors for Trypanosoma cruzi—Chaga’s disease agent
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

assassin bug

Any of the cone-nosed arthropods of the hemipteran family Reduviidae, order Hymenoptera, which includes true bugs, the trivial name refers to their insect predatory activity; those of the subfamily Triamtominae are vectors for Trypanosoma cruzi–Chagas' disease agent
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

as·sas·sin bug

(ă-sas'in bŭg)
An insect of the family Reduviidae that inflicts irritating, painful bites in animals and humans; related to the cone-nosed bugs (triatomines), a vector of American trypanosomiasis.
[Fr., fr. It. assassino, fr. Ar. hashshāshin, those addicted to hashish]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

assassin bug

A blood-sucking insect of the family Reduviidae . The insect transmitter of South American Trypanosomiasis (CHAGAS' DISEASE).
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
Recently we described the natural history and the resin-collecting behavior of the assassin bug Heniartes stali Wygodzinsky 1953 (Hemiptera: Reduviidae: Harpactorinae) in association with Rubus adenotrichos (Schltdl.) (Rosaceae), an Andean wild blackberry whose stems and buds are covered by a densely arranged glandular sticky trichomes.
The most unusual feature of an assassin bug is their "beak," or mouth part.
With around 90 genera and almost 1,000 described species (Maldonaldo, 1990; Reidi, 2007), the Emesinae are a cosmopolitan subfamily of assassin bug (Heteroptera: Reduviidae), characterised by their elongate and gracile body, legs, and antennae.
The male assassin bug sacrifices some of his offspring during his vigil, says Manica.
He told them it was called an assassin bug and that it ate small insects, like cockroaches, using its mouth like a sharp needle to pierce the insects and suck out their juices.
We have previously shown that the density of strict predators (spiders, assassin bugs) in lima beans was positively correlated with herbivore density.
Depending on your perspective you might say that some are "good," and some "bad." Oriental fruit moths, aphids, slugs and snails, cabbage loopers, thrips of every kind, cucumber, flea, and asparagus beetles, cutworms, spider mites, scales, lygus and mealy bugs are all checked and balanced by mealy bug destroyers, lacewings, ladybugs, tachinid flies, trichograma wasps, assassin bugs, hover flies, spined soldier bugs and tiny pirate bugs.
"Good clean food sources," says Tufts, meaning backyard bug populations that have not been doused with chemical pesticides, attract not just ladybugs and lacewings but other predators, such as the aptly-named assassin bugs.
These innocuous-looking orchard flowers lead the assault on the pecan's aphid enemies by enticing an unlikely army of lady beetles, lacewings and assassin bugs, thereby dramatically decreasing the need for spraying.
Assassin bugs: Stenolemus giraffa inhabits rock escarpments in North Western Australia, where it feeds almost exclusively on web-building spiders (Soley et al., 2011).
Prey capture in the wild usually occurs on vegetation, and frequently, the assassin bugs remain rather exposed during capture and feeding (C.