Asperger


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As·per·ger

(ahs'pĕr-gĕr),
Hans, Austrian pediatrician, 1906-1980. See: Asperger disorder.
References in periodicals archive ?
Susan, 55, who shot to fame winning Britain's Got Talent in 2009, was diagnosed with Asperger syndrome three years ago.
Parent, teacher, and self-report of problem and adaptive behaviors in children and adolescents with Asperger Syndrome.
It revealed a significantly higher rate of suicidal ideation among adults with Asperger Syndrome (66 per cent), compared with the rate found in the general population (17 per cent), and patients with psychosis (59 per cent) taken from other data sources.
USAAA calls upon the media to report accurately and responsibly, and refrain from remarks that may generalize any diagnosis, such as Asperger Syndrome, as inherently violent.
Students with Asperger demonstrate great strength in the visual cue systems, seeing and remembering patterns in letters, words, and text easily.
Esther, an Asperger sufferer, who has seen her self-esteem grow, is now studying at Birmingham City University and she's better able to interact with people now.
Online Asperger Syndrome Information and Support (OASIS) provides resources for individuals and medical professionals: www.
THERE is no link between Asperger syndrome and crime, according to a major study in 2006.
Jordan was diagnosed with Asperger syndrome, a type of autism, three years ago.
Viennese physician Hans Asperger identified these behaviors in 1944, but it wasn't until 1994 that Asperger's was entered into the DSM IV.
A world-renowned expert on Asperger syndrome will lead a conference in Eugene next week targeting parents, educators and other profession- als who work with children and adults with the syndrome.
The syndrome was first described by Hans Asperger, a Viennese physician, in 1944, but did not receive much attention until described by British psychiatrist, Lorna Wing in 1981 and subsequently included in the World Health Organization's International classification of diseases (ICD-10) in 1993 and the American Psychiatric Association's Diagnostic and statistical manual of mental disorders (DSM-IV) in 1994 (APA, 2000; Attwood, 2007; Lerner & Kline, 2006; WHO, 1993).