Ashkenazi Jews

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Ashkenazi Jews

In the 11th century, Ashkenazi Jews comprised 3% of the world's Jewish population, peaking at 92% in 1931; following the holocaust in World War II, that number decreased. Ashkenazi Jews now comprise ±80% of Jews worldwide.

Carrier rates, genetic diseases affecting Ashkenazi Jews
• Factor XI deficiency—1:9 to 1:20
• Gaucher disease, type 1—1:10 to 1:14
• Non-syndrome hearing loss—1:20 to 1:25
• Tay-Sachs disease—1:25 to 1:27
• Cystic fibrosis—1:29
• Familial dysautonomia—1:30
• Glycogen storage disease type III—1:35 (north African Jews)
• Canavan disease—1:40
• BRCA1, BRCA2—1:40
• Fanconi anaemia, type C—1:89
• Niemann-Pick disease, type A—1:90
• Mucolipidosis IV—1:99
• Bloom syndrome—1:110
• Maple syrup urine disease—1:113
• Glycogen storage disease type 1a—1:130
• Abetalipoproteinemia—1:131
• Primary torsion dystonia—1:1000 to 1:3000
References in periodicals archive ?
A week from this Saturday, Ashkenazic Jews the world over will convene at their synagoguesoften after midnightfor Selichot, the set of penitential prayers marking the beginning of the season of introspection that culminates some two weeks later on Yom Kippur.
At 1,000 years, the search for the location of Ashkenaz -- thought to be the birthplace of Ashkenazic Jews and the Yiddish language -- is one of the longest quests in human history.
The development of Yiddish printing transformed the intellectual culture of Ashkenazic Jews by providing a broad range of genres to a populace in its native tongue, making available a knowledge corpus theretofore closed to Hebrew-illiterates.
Medieval Ashkenazic Jews perceived their synagogues as almost total embodiments of the Temple in Jerusalem, Woolf finds, which directly affected synagogue design, etiquette, and practice.
Long the main language for Ashkenazic Jews, even in the first generations of emigration, the status and continued importance of Yiddish was called into question during the interwar period by linguistic acculturation and the growing strength of modern Hebrew as a language and ideology.
In contrast with the Paris chapter of the AIU, which had always been an organization of Ashkenazic Jews working for the benefit of Sephardic Jews, Sephardic Jews played a major role in the leadership of the American Friends from the beginning.
The test revealed a specific sequence in the DNA passed through the maternal line through the generations known as haplogroup N1b1, associated with Ashkenazic Jews.
In the 11th-century CE, Rabbi Gershom ben Judah promulgated an express prohibition against polygamy for Ashkenazic Jews of Europe.
Jeffrey Lesser published in 1995 his masterful Welcoming the Undesirables: Brazil and the Jewish Question, in which he pointed out that, while the Jews were undesirable as non-Catholics, as speakers of languages totally alien to Portuguese (we are speaking here of Ashkenazic Jews, not Sephardic Jews, who Sephardic Spanish or Portuguese would be intelligible), and as practitioners of cultural (social, religious, legal) institutions equally alien to Luso-Brazilian society, Getulio Vargas was, nevertheless willing to welcome them (with some significant betrayals) because he needed them as scientists, engineers, technicians, and all-round intellectuals for the projects of his Estado Novo.
Feeling uncomfortable with a rising Arab nationalism the Jews left en masse for France, enriching Jewish life in various parts of France, where Ashkenazic Jews had only a tenuous hold on Jewish traditions.
Rather than classifying the work as Jewish moral literature, they regard it as an encyclopedia which makes longer Kabbalistic passages of the Zohar accessible for the first time by translation into the lingua franca of Ashkenazic Jews.
Thematically organized into six chapters, the book focuses on the interactions between these immigrants and the dominant Yiddish-speaking Ashkenazic Jews, the long-established Western Sephardim, and the non-Jewish Hispanic minority in New York.