Ashkenazi Jews

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Related to Ashkenazic: Mizrahi Jews

Ashkenazi Jews

In the 11th century, Ashkenazi Jews comprised 3% of the world's Jewish population, peaking at 92% in 1931; following the holocaust in World War II, that number decreased. Ashkenazi Jews now comprise ±80% of Jews worldwide.

Carrier rates, genetic diseases affecting Ashkenazi Jews
• Factor XI deficiency—1:9 to 1:20
• Gaucher disease, type 1—1:10 to 1:14
• Non-syndrome hearing loss—1:20 to 1:25
• Tay-Sachs disease—1:25 to 1:27
• Cystic fibrosis—1:29
• Familial dysautonomia—1:30
• Glycogen storage disease type III—1:35 (north African Jews)
• Canavan disease—1:40
• BRCA1, BRCA2—1:40
• Fanconi anaemia, type C—1:89
• Niemann-Pick disease, type A—1:90
• Mucolipidosis IV—1:99
• Bloom syndrome—1:110
• Maple syrup urine disease—1:113
• Glycogen storage disease type 1a—1:130
• Abetalipoproteinemia—1:131
• Primary torsion dystonia—1:1000 to 1:3000
References in periodicals archive ?
In this sense, Isaac functions as a link for Duncan to his past, tracing back to the medieval Ashkenazic Jewish culture and tradition once prosperous in Poland.
25) While Indian Jews were formally welcome to participate in Ashkenazic institutions, they felt uncomfortable, even demeaned and demoralized, in these institutions, especially since they were repeatedly questioned about their Jewishness.
Considering that this chapter focuses on the Ashkenazic revival of Hebrew, it adds little about the Sephardim and feels slightly disconnected from the rest of the book.
29) and her discussion here gives the reader insight into the process whereby Christian iconography was adapted to suit a Jewish context in the decorative programmes of medieval Ashkenazic illuminated manuscripts.
A look at Ashkenazic synagogues such as shtiebels and haredi batei midrash or at religious Zionist synagogues shows that the ethnic rites in these places are backed by a religious educational system.
Consistent with Miles' original conception of racialization being inclusive of whites, it should be noted that there are chapters on Sephardic Jews (who may range over quite a diverse racial spectrum, and have tended to stress--or be obliged to stress--their uniqueness from the Ashkenazic Jewish majority) and Greeks in Calgary, both of which recount some forms of discrimination directed against Caucasian groups.
Perhaps a study of Levi, who does thematize Yiddish, in a manner which has had a massive impact on the Italian reception of Ashkenazic culture, might have been more at home in this volume, but one is nevertheless grateful to the editors for bringing us this deeply sensitive study of an identite juive octroyee and of the psychological process by which the human spirit can accommodate to omnipresent daily horror.
Many Jews are linked by common genetic threads, which can be manifested as DNA markers associated with kohanim, or as Ashkenazic or Sefardic recessive disease genes, or as cancer-causing BRCA genes.
Grossman explores the ban against polygyny for Ashkenazic Jewry, attributed to R.
The truth contained in these words has by now been rather underrated, as far as the linguistic identity of Ashkenazic Jewry is concerned.
When I was five, an itinerant melamed arrived from Cuba, and the small Ashkenazic community gathered its children into a class so that they might be united not only by the common experience of escape, rescue and refuge, but the ongoing conversation, the nigun and nusach of Jewish learning.