Ashkenazi Jews


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Related to Ashkenazi Jews: Mizrahi Jews

Ashkenazi Jews

In the 11th century, Ashkenazi Jews comprised 3% of the world's Jewish population, peaking at 92% in 1931; following the holocaust in World War II, that number decreased. Ashkenazi Jews now comprise ±80% of Jews worldwide.

Carrier rates, genetic diseases affecting Ashkenazi Jews
• Factor XI deficiency—1:9 to 1:20
• Gaucher disease, type 1—1:10 to 1:14
• Non-syndrome hearing loss—1:20 to 1:25
• Tay-Sachs disease—1:25 to 1:27
• Cystic fibrosis—1:29
• Familial dysautonomia—1:30
• Glycogen storage disease type III—1:35 (north African Jews)
• Canavan disease—1:40
• BRCA1, BRCA2—1:40
• Fanconi anaemia, type C—1:89
• Niemann-Pick disease, type A—1:90
• Mucolipidosis IV—1:99
• Bloom syndrome—1:110
• Maple syrup urine disease—1:113
• Glycogen storage disease type 1a—1:130
• Abetalipoproteinemia—1:131
• Primary torsion dystonia—1:1000 to 1:3000
References in periodicals archive ?
Recent studies suggest that Ashkenazi Jews are likely descended from Jewish men and European women who converted to Judaism.
Ashkenazi Jews were as closely related to each other as fourth or fifth cousins, which is about ten times higher than the genetic closeness between two individuals chosen at random on a street in Manhattan.
Yet despite the evidence for medieval Jewish towns throughout Eastern Europe, the standard narrative of medieval Jewish culture includes only the Sephardic Jews of Iberia and the Ashkenazi Jews of the Rhineland, the "cradle and center of Jewry.
Cochran and Harpending single out the Ashkenazi Jews as a textbook example of how cultural decisions from just a few hundred years ago (a nanosecond in the conventional view of evolution) have already resulted in new genetic advantages.
The hospital will now carry out a pilot programme among London's Ashkenazi Jews.
According to Wikipedia, Ashkenazi Jews number 80% of the world's Jewish population today.
Monthly Income from Work of Urban Salaried Persons 1998-2007 Ashkenazi Jews Mizrahi Jews Arabs 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2002 2003 2004 Ashkenazi Jews 139 139 139 138 125 126 137 136 Mizrahi Jews 94 92 95 95 99 100 100 100 Arabs 71 66 67 70 73 71 73 75 2005 2006 2007 Ashkenazi Jews 139 136 137 Mizrahi Jews 100 102 106 Arabs 72 68 71 Notes: 1.
What we've agreed today will provide a framework within which both practical and sometimes challenging issues can be discussed on the basis of mutual trust and respect," said Archbishop Williams, the leader of the global Anglican Communion, after signing the agreement with Rabbi Amar, the chief Sephardi rabbi, and Rabbi Metzger who represents Ashkenazi Jews, who mostly come from Europe.
In the early twentieth century, Ladino-speaking Sephardic Jews escaping a collapsed Ottoman Empire were the next to put down roots, followed by Yiddish-speaking Ashkenazi Jews from Russia and Eastern Europe after World War I.
The women were all Ashkenazi Jews, a sect known for their belief that every new born baby is a blessing.
The major defect in Ashkenazi Jews with Tay Sachs Disease is an insertion in the gene for the alpha-chain of beta hexosaminidase.
Beyond these poles of sympathy and bigotry, Professor Nadler shows how Rembrandt sketched the Ashkenazi Jews of Amsterdam in order to depict Old Testament scenes--what in the nineteenth century we call Orientalism--as in the etching The Pharisees in the Temple.