ascospore

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Related to Ascospores: Cladosporium, Basidiospores

ascospore

 [as´ko-spor]
a spore contained or produced in an ascus.

as·co·spore

(as'kō-spōr),
A spore formed within an ascus; the sexual spore of Ascomycetes.
[G. askos, bag, + sporos, seed]

ascospore

a HAPLOID spore resulting from MEIOSIS in the ASCUS within the fruiting body of ASCOMYCETE fungi.
References in periodicals archive ?
Thus, targeting the sclerotia, the source of apothecia and ascospores, is a good control tactics for decreasing primary infection resource of plant diseases.
Surgery and soil accumulation of eliminated leaves significantly reduced leaf area exposed to ascospore discharge and decreased up to 80% inoculum production potential and black sigatoka severity (OROZCO-SANTOS et al., 2002).
All above mentioned genera are widely used in the experimental class of genetics to study crossing over and gene conversion due to the unique arrangement of ascospores in an ascus as genetic model organisms (Ines et al., 2010).
Our case is from 2003 when MALDI-TOF MS was unavailable and diagnosis was based on culture and special stains showing the characteristic ascospores (Figure 1(d)) and Vitek.
Different studies [5, 9] have confirmed that during spring and the beginning of summer the severity of the epidemic was conditioned by pycnidiospores produced in the crop; nevertheless, ascospores were present since the first basal leaves were infected [9, 10].
We have been studying the delay since 1997." We first observed that there was a delay in the release of ascospores from the remaining overwintering cleistothecia such that release did not occur even though conditions were suitable until a period of warm weather occurred.
Apple scab, for example, manifested itself in black fungal lesions on the surface of leaves, buds, or fruits, and underwent sexual reproduction in the leaf litter around the base of the tree over winter, producing a new generation of ascospores the following spring.
Other than the ascomata opening by a flat circular lid, the family was characterized by bitunicate and fissitunicate, clavate or ellipsoidal, short pedicellate asci, and applanate or rarely cylindrical ascospores with three or more transverse septa with or without longitudinal septa and usually with a thick sheath and frequently circular in section but narrowing to one end [1,2].