Aesculapius

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Aesculapius

 [es″cu-la´pe-us]
the god of healing in Roman mythology. The staff of Aesculapius, a rod or staff with a snake entwined around it, is a symbol of medicine and is the official insignia of the American Medical Association.
Staff of Aesculapius.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

Aesculapius

(ĕs′kyə-lā′pē-əs)
n. Roman Mythology
The god of medicine and healing.

Aes′cu·la′pi·an adj.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

Aesculapius

The Greek mythological son of Apollo. Aesculapius was the God of medicine. His symbol was the snake twined round a staff-now the universal symbol of medicine. His daughters were Hygeia and Therapia, representing, respectively, preventive medicine and medical treatment.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
Herrell's opinion is that "few students today would take swearing by Apollo and Asclepius seriously" [27].
He says the plaque indicates that an ancient Greek healing temple must have existed here between the 2nd Century BC and 3rd Century BC, which would have been built by colonists to promote the cult of Asclepius.
Children, in this collection, tend to inherit their parents' pathologies, such as schizophrenia ("Sharing the Hostage"), depression ("La Tristesse des Herissons"), the impulse to control other people's fates ("The Rod of Asclepius"), or, if they're lucky, the pursuit of safe and boring suburban cul-de-sac existences ("Limerence").
The most famous dream site in antiquity was at Epidaurus, a sanctuary dedicated to Asclepius, the god of healing.
(54) The latter duo was recast in Greco-Roman tradition as Asclepius (Asklepius) and his son or servant Telesphoros ("who brings a good end"), represented as a smaller hooded figure who often took the form of a dwarf.
For example, as discussed in Edward Tick's The Practice of Dream Healing: Bringing Ancient Greek Mysteries into Modern Medicine, ancient Greeks would ritually enter sleep in a sacred healing temple dedicated to Asclepius, the god of medicine.
However, medicine and healing eventually became associated with his son Asclepius, now also known by the Roman name Aesculapus.
Pagan devotees dreamt of healing gods like Asclepius coming and informing them of their healing.
There are more than 20 kinds of milkweed in North America, but the specific type targeted for the wartime effort was the common milkweed (Asclepius syriaca).
Claudio Moreschini shows that the Latin work called Asclepius, an early translation of a Greek Hermetic text, was well known to medieval theologians and often quoted by them.
The third awkward point in Heracles's argument is that Philoctetes--though injured and crippled--will be referred to Asclepius, (31) the putative reliever [TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII]: