ascending lumbar vein

(redirected from Ascending lumbar)

as·cend·ing lum·bar vein

[TA]
paired, vertical vein of the posterior abdominal wall, adjacent and parallel to the vertebral column, posterior to the origin of the psoas major muscle; it connects the common iliac, iliolumbar, and lumbar veins in the paravertebral line, the right vein joining the right subcostal vein to form the azygos vein, the left vein uniting with the left subcostal vein to form the hemiazygos vein.
Synonym(s): vena lumbalis ascendens [TA]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

as·cend·ing lum·bar vein

(ă-send'ing lŭm'bahr vān) [TA]
A paired, vertical vein of the posterior abdominal wall, adjacent and parallel to the vertebral column, posterior to the origin of the psoas major muscle; it connects the common iliac, iliolumbar, and lumbar veins in the paravertebral line, the right vein joining the right subcostal vein to form the azygos vein, the left vein uniting with the left subcostal vein to form the hemiazygos vein.
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

ascending lumbar vein

An anterior-posterior vein along the posterior abdominal wall that connects the common iliac, iliolumbar, and lumbar veins; it empties into the subcostal, azygos, hemiazygos, or first lumbar vein.
See also: vein
Medical Dictionary, © 2009 Farlex and Partners
References in periodicals archive ?
Caudally, they join the corresponding subcardinal vein close to the inter-cardinal anastomosis thus the azygos vein originates as the ascending lumbar vein on both sides.
Lumbar veins drain blood from the abdominal wall and vertebral venous plexus into the inferior vena cava, ascending lumbar veins, renal veins, or lumbar azygous vein.
"Nutcracker phenomenon" is due to increased pressure in RLRV which is communicated through gonadal, ascending lumbar, adrenal and ureteral veins.
Azygos vein is formed by the union of the ascending lumbar veins with the right subcostal veins at the level of the 12th thoracic vertebra, ascending in the posterior mediastinum, and arching over the right main bronchus at the root of the right lung to join the superior venacave.
The terminations of the right and left ascending lumbar veins when present are traced and studied in relation to the aortic opening and the crura of the diaphragm.
A computed tomography (CT) scan of the abdomen/pelvis with intravenous contrast revealed thrombosis of the distal inferior vena cava (IVC) and iliac veins with a congenital absence of suprarenal and intrahepatic segments of the IVC (Fig1&2) with extensive collaterals and prominent ascending lumbar, perivertebral, azygous and hemiazygous venous systems.
(1,3,4) Prominent collateral vessels may develop, and the gonadal, ascending lumbar, adrenal, periureteral, and capsular veins are major potential collateral veins that can develop from left renal vein compression or obstruction.
Nausea and syncope are due to low cardiac output following inferior caval compression at the bifurcation (complete in 90%, with variable patency of collateral ascending lumbar and spinal canal veins to the azygous veins), while the foetal effects (4,5), including foetal heart rate changes irrespective of the presence or absence of maternal hypotension (6), are also secondary to aortoiliac displacement (usually to the left) and aortoiliac compression (most marked across the lumbar lordosis at L3-5 and exaggerated by uterine contraction) (7,8).
They drain either into inferior vena cava, lumbar azygos vein or ascending lumbar vein.
These vessels are oriented craniocaudally and connected to the ascending lumbar veins, which are located laterally on the vertebral bodies, via the supra- and infrapedicular veins.
Ascending lumbar veins on either side received lumbar and subcostal veins of their corresponding side and terminated in the azygos vein.
A dilated communicating vein between the left renal vein and the left ascending lumbar vein is one of them regarding which there have been only a few cases reported in literature.