Ascaris lumbricoides


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Related to Ascaris lumbricoides: Enterobius vermicularis, Necator americanus

As·ca·ris lum·bri·coi·des

a large roundworm of humans, one of the most common human parasites (20-25 cm in length); various symptoms such as restlessness, fever, and sometimes diarrhea are attributed to its presence, but usually it causes no definite symptoms; the similar species, Ascaris suum (or Ascaris lumbricoides suum) is common in swine but is not readily transmitted to humans; Ascaris lumbricoides and Ascaris suum are morphologically and immunologically similar but apparently are host adapted, considered distinct species.

Ascaris lumbricoides

A 15–40 cm long intestinal roundworm (nematode) with a three-lipped mouth which, once ingested and after a transpulmonary migration, resides in the small intestine.

As·ca·ris lum·bri·coi·des

(as'kă-ris lŭm-bri-koy'dēz)
A large roundworm of humans, one of the most common human parasites; various symptoms such as restlessness, fever, and diarrhea are attributed to its presence, but usually it causes no definite symptoms.

Ascaris lumbricoides

A species of Ascaris that lives in the human intestine; adults may grow to 12 in long. Eggs are passed with the feces and require at least 2 weeks' incubation in the soil before they become infective. After being swallowed, the eggs hatch in the intestinal tract, and the larvae enter the venous circulation and pass to the lungs. From there they migrate up the respiratory passages, are swallowed, and reach their site of continued residence, the jejunum. In a 1- to 2-year life span, the female is capable of producing 200,000 eggs a day. The eggs are passed with the feces, and a new cycle is started. Children up to the ages of 12 to 14 are likely to be infected. Intestinal obstruction may be a complication in children under 6 years of age.

Treatment

Albendazole and mebendazole are the drugs most commonly used to treat infection with Ascaris.

illustration
See also: Ascaris
References in periodicals archive ?
When found in the gallbladder, an Ascaris lumbricoides infection most often requires a cholecystectomy.
The influence of individual, social group and household factors on the distribution of Ascaris lumbricoides within a community and implication for control strategies.
Trabajos previos realizados en indigenas de la region reflejan que las principales especies identificadas fueron Entamoeba histolytica, Giardia lamblia y Blastocystis hominis entre los protozoarios, y Ascaris lumbricoides, Trichuris trichiura e Hymenolepis nana entre los helmintos (Chourio de L.
Ascaris lumbricoides intensity in relation to environmental, socioeconomic, and behavioral determinants of exposure to infection in children from southeast Madagascar.
The prevalence and intensity of Ascaris lumbricoides infections in Moslem children from northern Bangladesh.
Ultrastructural organization of obliquely striated muscle fibers in Ascaris lumbricoides. J.
(0.7%), and Ascaris lumbricoides (0.7%) (Figure 1).
LAMP has been used in the diagnosis of protozoan parasitic pathogens such as Plasmodium falciparum [24], human infective Trypanosoma rhodesiense [21] and pathogens found in stool such as Ascaris lumbricoides [25] and Necator americanus [26].
(44,02%), Entamoeba coli (32,06%) Endolimax nana (25,36%) Ascaris lumbricoides (23,92%) Trichuris trichiura (6,70%).
The study also considered Ascaris lumbricoides because it is more resistant in sludge than all other helminths and is used as an indicator organism [23].